Cover

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pp. 1-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

...This volume has been a collaborative eff ort, and we would like to thank Bowdoin College; the Chicago Humanities Visiting Committee; the Franke Institute for the Humanities; the Karla Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture; the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture; 3ct; and the...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-20

...At the turn of the twentieth century, when state legislatures across the U.S. South had determined that the solution to the nation’s so-called Negro Problem was to exile black Americans from the region’s political life, the Baptist minister Sutton Elbert Griggs (1872–1933) embarked on a novel- writing career...

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Sutton Griggs and the Borderlands of Empire

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pp. 21-48

...The first of these slogans graces a banner described in the “Plan de San Diego”—the fifteen-step revolutionary plan written in 1915 by an anonymous group of Mexican American and Mexican revolutionaries in South Texas who purportedly had the backing of Germany and Japan in their plan to reclaim...

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Empires at Home and Abroad in Sutton E. Griggs’s Imperium in Imperio

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pp. 49-68

...One of the most notable developments in twenty-first-century scholarship, the movement away from U.S.-centered approaches to America, enables scholars to cross disciplinary boundaries, make connections among texts heretofore associated with discrete national literatures or regional area studies, and delineate...

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Edward Everett Hale’s and Sutton E. Griggs’s Men without a Country

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pp. 69-87

...of their publication. This chapter examines intertextual connections between Hale’s popular short story and Griggs’s first two novels, focusing on the authors’ narrative figurations of nation (or country) in relation to debates on race, patriotism, and imperialism. In his fi rst two novels, Griggs, I suggest, honors, revises, and recuperates Hale’s phenomenally popular short story, discerning...

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Moving Up a Dead-End Ladder: Black Class Mobility, Death, and Narrative Closure in Sutton Griggs’s Overshadowed

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pp. 88-110

...tragic outcomes when they threaten existing class hierarchies. In fact, nearly every ambitious, upwardly mobile black American in the novel meets what might be called a “dead end”: whether physical demise or the more fi gurative social death of silencing, exile, and marginalization that signals characters’ expulsion...

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Social Darwinism, American Imperialism, and the Origins of the Science of Collective Efficiency in Sutton E. Griggs’s Unfettered

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pp. 111-142

...Of the five academic disciplines Griggs references in his defi nition of the Science of Collective Efficiency, I am most interested in theories and ideas he selects from sociology and history and how he uses them to illuminate the contemporary events and issues that dominate his fiction. It is noteworthy that Griggs...

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Reading in Sutton E. Griggs

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pp. 143-166

...Gloster, that “because Griggs was industrious enough to establish his own publishing companies and to promote the sale of his books among the black masses of the country, his novels, though virtually unknown to white American readers, were probably more widely circulated among Negroes than the fiction of [Charles Waddell] Chesnutt and [Paul Laurence] Dunbar.” Gloster’s “probably” would...

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Sutton E. Griggs against Thomas Dixon’s “Vile Misrepresentations”: The Hindered Hand and The Leopard’s Spots

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pp. 167-185

...protagonist, Ensal Ellwood, Mr. A. Hostility, a white fanatic, comes across the book “of a rather conspicuous Southern man” whose purpose it is to discredit the African American race. The reference to Dixon’s novel is so obvious that Griggs does not even bother to spell it out. Ensal, aware of Dixon’s great popularity, fears his book will infl uence Americans decisively against the African...

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Harnessing the Niagara: Sutton E. Griggs’s The Hindered Hand

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pp. 186-213

...writing in hopes of lowering the heat while still eff ecting cultural change. Ensal’s militant friend, Earl, is planning armed conflict, a direct confrontation with white supremacist forces aimed at pressing the issues so long repressed by the racist protocols of the day. “Going to his desk,” Griggs writes, Ensal procures...

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Jim Crow and the House of Fiction: Charles W. Chesnutt’s and Sutton E. Griggs’s Last Novels

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pp. 214-253

...and least critically analyzed works of two of the most prolific black novelists at the beginning of the twentieth century. These novels have rarely been examined in relation to each other. Yet they do not simply share a close chronological proximity and related topical concerns (including disenfranchisement, the neoslavery of segregation, and the convict- lease system). Rather...

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Perfecting the Political Romance: The Last Novel of Sutton Griggs

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pp. 254-282

...book that had persuaded many of its white readers of the need and justice of disenfranchising black Americans and driving them from the political life of the South—the National Baptist Convention had voted to ask Griggs to write a novelistic refutation. Despite his earlier disappointments, Griggs, a Baptist minister...

Chronology: The Life and Times of Sutton E. Griggs

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pp. 283-288

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 289-292

Contributors

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pp. 293-296

Index

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pp. 297-212