In this Book

summary
The essays in Creating and Contesting Carolina shed new light on how the various peoples of the Carolinas responded to the tumultuous changes shaping the geographic space that the British called Carolina during the Proprietary period (1663–1719). In doing so, the essays focus attention on some of the most important and dramatic watersheds in the history of British colonization in the New World. These years brought challenging and dramatic changes to the region, such as the violent warfare between British and Native Americans or British and Spanish, the no-less dramatic development of the plantation system, and the decline of proprietary authority. All involved contestation, whether through violence or debate. The very idea of a place called Carolina was challenged by Native Americans, and many colonists and metropolitan authorities differed in their visions for Carolina. The stakes were high in these contests because they occurred in an early American world often characterized by brutal warfare, rigid hierarchies, enslavement, cultural dislocation, and transoceanic struggles for power. While Native Americans and colonists shed each other’s blood to define the territory on their terms, colonists and officials built their own version of Carolina on paper and in the discourse of early modern empires. But new tensions also provided a powerful incentive for political and economic creativity. The peoples of the early Carolinas reimagined places, reconceptualized cultures, realigned their loyalties, and adapted in a wide variety of ways to the New World. Three major groups of peoples—European colonists, Native Americans, and enslaved Africans—shared these experiences of change in the Carolinas, but their histories have usually been written separately. These disparate but closely related strands of scholarship must be connected to make the early Carolinas intelligible. Creating and Contesting Carolina brings together work relating to all three groups in this unique collection.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. iii-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-ix
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  1. Note on Maps
  2. pp. x-x
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  1. List of Maps
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. xv-xvi
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  1. Introduction: Creating and Contesting Carolina
  2. pp. 1-23
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  1. PART I: Backgrounds
  2. pp. 25-25
  1. Defining Carolina: Cartography and Colonization in the North American Southeast, 1657–1733
  2. pp. 27-48
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  1. Venturing Out: The Barbadian Diaspora and the Carolina Colony, 1650–1685
  2. pp. 49-72
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  1. Dr. Henry Woodward’s Role in Early Carolina Indian Relations
  2. pp. 73-93
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  1. PART II: Violence and Conflict
  2. pp. 95-95
  1. The Economic Philosophies of Indian Trade Regulation Policy in Early South Carolina
  2. pp. 97-117
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  1. “Cutting one anothers throats”: British, Native, and African Violence in Early Carolina
  2. pp. 118-139
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  1. “Before long to be good friends”: Diplomatic Perspectives of the Tuscarora War
  2. pp. 140-163
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  1. War, Masculinity, and Alliances on the Carolina Frontiers
  2. pp. 164-185
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  1. Histories of the “Tuscarora War”
  2. pp. 186-208
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  1. PART III: Building Plantations, Challenging Authority
  2. pp. 209-209
  1. Thomas Pollock and the Making of an Albemarle Plantation World
  2. pp. 211-233
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  1. Diversity in the Slave Trade to the Colonial Carolinas
  2. pp. 234-255
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  1. Marooned: Politics and Revolution in the Bahamas Islands and Carolina
  2. pp. 256-272
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  1. “The Proprietors can’t undertake for what they will do”: A Political Interpretation of the South Carolina Revolution of 1719
  2. pp. 273-294
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  1. Protecting the Rights of Englishmen: The Rise and Fall of Carolina’s Piratical State
  2. pp. 295-317
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  1. PART IV: Aftermaths
  2. pp. 319-319
  1. Forging Alliances: The Impact of the Tuscarora War on North Carolina’s Political Leadership
  2. pp. 321-342
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  1. “The Indians that live about Pon Pon”: John and Mary Musgrove and the Making of a Creek Indian Community in South Carolina, 1717–1732
  2. pp. 343-366
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 367-369
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 371-382
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781611172737
Related ISBN
9781611172720
MARC Record
OCLC
864675560
Pages
400
Launched on MUSE
2013-11-04
Language
English
Open Access
No
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