Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, About the Series, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-x

The book Marine Botany by Clinton J. Dawes has been used as the lecture textbook in marine botany and other classes at Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi. However, Dawes’s book focused on the plants of tropical Florida and did not include a comprehensive coverage of the Texas plants. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Numerous individuals, groups, and institutions supported and encouraged me to complete this work. I thank and am grateful to my many students, colleagues, and friends for their assistance and participation. To all of them, too numerous to list, I offer my grateful appreciation. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

It has been my intention to provide students, nature lovers, amateur naturalists, conservation workers, parks and wildlife personnel, teachers, and others with an up-to-date, easy-to-use account of the marine plants known to grow along the Texas coast and, at the same time, provide logical keys for identifying the plants. ...

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I. Common Shoreline Plants of the Texas Coast

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pp. 7-56

Along the shoreline fringe of Texas coastal marshes is a group of plants often overlooked or thought to be of little value. In reality, they are unique vascular plants that have had to adapt to a very hostile environment, most notably, one of higher salinity. Biologists regard these plants, which are located along estuarine creeks and intertidal shorelines, ...

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II. Seagrasses of the Texas Coast

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pp. 57-72

Seagrasses are flowering plants (angiosperms) that are commonly found submerged in the marine environment. They grow in shallow coastal waters in estuaries, hypersaline lagoons, and brackish-water areas of the Texas coast. They are monocotyledons but not true grasses of the family Poaceae. ...

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III. Mangroves of the Texas Coast

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pp. 73-82

Mangrove comes from the two words mangue, “tree” (Portuguese for Rhizophora), and grove, “stand of trees.” Mangroves occur in muddy, tidal waters throughout most of the tropical and subtropical world in areas protected from wave action and in zones of high sedimentation. Characteristically, the plants grow in quiet lagoons and/or estuaries and are closely associated with the intertidal marine environment. ...

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IV. Common Seaweeds of the Texas Coast

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pp. 83-178

People have named and classified plants (and animals) for thousands of years. In early systems, taxonomists constructed classification schemes that recognized the similarity of groups and gathered them into clusters of natural assemblages. As science advanced, newer phylogenetic classification schemes have been developed and employed. ...

Appendix: Collection and Preparation Techniques

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pp. 179-184

Glossary

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pp. 185-198

Bibliography

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pp. 199-202

Index

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pp. 203-212

Other Works in the Series, Back Cover

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pp. 228-234