Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

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pp. vii-xxv

Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey and her father, Eric Trethewey, have shared the platform for several poetry readings; and their relationship as biracial child and divorced Caucasian parent is a subject of Thrall (2012), her latest book. Shortly after her selection as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress for 2012–2013, both authors were interviewed by Mike...

Chronology

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pp. xxvi-2

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An Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 3-17

JILL PETTY: Photography figures a lot in your work—often you’re in the heads of black people while they’re being photographed, or speaking to whites who are taking those pictures. What does that allow you to explore? What are you saying about visibility or spectatorship? ...

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A Conversation with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 18-32

This interview took place March 28, 2003, in the office of Cold Mountain Review at Appalachian State University, during Natasha Trethewey’s visit as part of Appalachian State’s Visiting Writers Series. Trethewey, who teaches creative writing at Emory University, is the author of two collections of poems...

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Natasha Trethewey—Decatur, Georgia

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pp. 33-36

No city offers a more stunning transition from its ring of highways and interstates to its inner hub of suburban plots. Coming into Atlanta is like driving on the Ugly Highway to Ugly Town. The gray slabs extend to four and five lanes in every direction. Cloverleaf after cloverleaf—almost all of them...

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Interview: Natasha Trethewey on Facts, Photographs, and Loss

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pp. 37-44

Sara Kaplan: Poets find their inspiration from any number of sources— paintings and songs, for example. American history, or more specifically, southern American history, seems to be from where you draw much of your inspiration. Your poems reinterpret our history, however, not from the...

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An Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 45-60

Natasha Trethewey’s subject is history: hers; her mother’s—Gwendolyn Ann Turnbough; her mother’s tragic death at the hands of a divorced second husband; the Louisiana Native Guards—freed slaves serving the Union by guarding Confederate soldiers imprisoned at Fort Massachusetts on Ship...

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Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 61-76

The day is a whirlwind. Professor Trethewey enters apologizing for her tardiness and explains that this has been another morning filled with unexpected demands. Even so, after appearances on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer and Fresh Air with Terry Gross, most tasks are just footnotes on her path following the Pulitzer Prize. In April, after the prizes were announced and she was...

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Natasha Trethewey Interview

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pp. 77-86

Jonathan Fink: Welcome. This is Jon Fink. I am here representing Panhandler and the University of West Florida. We are thrilled today to have Natasha Trethewey to talk with. I guess we should start with telling you congratulations on the Pulitzer Prize...

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An Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 87-91

Poet Natasha Trethewey spoke about her 2007 Pulitzer Prize–winning book, Native Guard, on Martin Luther King Day—perhaps fitting for someone who chronicles growing up biracial in the South with a black mom and white dad who were not allowed to get married in their own state. A portion...

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Conversation between Natasha Trethewey and Alan Fox in New York City, January 31st, 2008

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pp. 92-105

Fox: We’re in New York City on January 31st, 2008, with Natasha Trethewey. For a young poet, you’ve won a lot of prizes. How has that affected you?
TRETHEWEY: The most recent prize of course is the one that I never could have dreamed of in a million years. But at some point while writing...

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Because of Blood: Natasha Trethewey’s Historical Memory

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pp. 106-112

She reads with a clear cadence and soothing tone, occasionally glancing at the page for formality’s sake, as if she has the poem memorized. Here is a little secret; she does. “I tend to be a real foot-tapper,” states Natasha Trethewey, the third African American woman after Gwendolyn Brooks...

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An Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 113-125

Christian Teresi: Each of your books has an increased formal element. How much of your maturation as a writer played into your ability to progress formally?...

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Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 126-135

This interview was conducted in December 2009, as Natasha Trethewey completed the James Weldon Johnson Fellowship in African American Studies at the Yale University Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscript Library. The interview came on the tails of a conversation between Elizabeth Alexander...

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A Conversation with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 136-149

This interview was conducted in March 2010 at the University of Missouri, where the poet participated in writing residencies with the graduate students of the creative writing program. The conversation took place, it should be noted, after a very pleasant lunch...

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Outside the Frame: An Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 150-155

Natasha Trethewey was the featured poet at Oklahoma City University’s annual Thatcher Hoffman Smith Distinguished Writer Series, supported in part by a grant from OHC. Trethewey’s poems explore cultural memory and ethnic identity, which reflect her own experience as the child of a black mother and white father and her fascination with lost histories. She won...

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Southern Crossings: An Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 156-167

This interview was conducted on April 23, 2010 in Loudonville, New York, where Trethewey served as the featured writer for Siena College’s Greyfriar Living Literature Series...

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Jake Adam York Interviews Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 168-173

Jake Adam York: So you lived in Atlanta, or went to school in Atlanta, from the age of six or seven?
Natasha Trethewey: Yes, six—first grade...

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Report from Part Three: Rita Dove and Natasha Trethewey, Entering the World through Language

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pp. 174-195

Byrd: Welcome to this dialogue, which we have called, “Report from Part Three.” And “Report from Part Three” is a reference to “Report from Part One” and “Report from Part Two,” the autobiographies of Gwendolyn Brooks, who was the first African American to receive the Pulitzer Prize for...

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An Interview with Natasha Trethewey

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pp. 196-204

Jocelyn Heath: Beyond Katrina blends personal and collective memories of an event that is not too long gone from the public eye, and is still current for those living on the Gulf Coast. What are the challenges of writing about something topical, even if it has personal resonance for you the writer?...

Index

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pp. 205-216