Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Carl Geiser had a strong sense of his own history. The only book he wrote, Prisoners of the Good Fight, carefully documented the experience and context of his own POW status during the Spanish Civil War. After that project, Geiser worked with family members and friends to transcribe and annotate the letters he sent home from the war. In preparing the letters for...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

“Probably you are a bit surprised to hear I am in Spain fighting with the army of the Spanish Republic,” Carl Geiser wrote to his brother, Bennet, nine days after he crossed the border into Spain on May 1, 1937. “And so I suppose you want to know why I am here.” Geiser’s politics were no secret to his family, but the new recruit had been prudent, so far, to...

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Carl Geiser’s Letters

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pp. 15-180

[handwritten on Cunard Line stationery]

Sunday [April 18, 1937]
Dear Impy:
Just finished watching “Charlie Chan at the Opera,” for we have movies every other day or so. And now I will take time out to write you a while.
Everything is going marvelously. The only thing missing is you (and especially since there is not even one pretty girl on board—they are practically...

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Postscript

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pp. 181-183

The sun was rising in a cloudless sky on a fresh and lovely spring morning.197 Bushes and small trees along the ridge provided cover as we advanced rapidly. In less than ten minutes we came to a dip in the ridge. A faint odor of wood fires alerted me. I halted when I saw ahead of us several hundred soldiers preparing their breakfasts on a slope facing us. They...

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Epilogue

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pp. 184-187

General Franco ordered the execution of any International Brigader taken prisoner, a policy largely followed through the war. Geiser, along with the other soldiers captured with him, expected to face a firing squad. When told to assemble in front of a wall, they steadied themselves, ready to sing “The Internationale” as a last act of defiance against their executioners. But...

Notes

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pp. 188-201

Suggested Readings

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pp. 202-202

Index

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pp. 203-206

Back Cover

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pp. 218-218