Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Series Foreword

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pp. ix-x

We are pleased to present the sixty-fifth volume in the series Linguistic Inquiry Monographs. These monographs present new and original research beyond the scope of the article. We hope they will benefit our field by bringing to it perspectives that will stimulate further research and insight.
Originally published in limited edition, the Linguistic Inquiry Monographs...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

This book is concerned with the semantics and pragmatics of subjunctive conditionals. The term subjunctive conditional has been traditionally used in the philosophical literature to refer to those conditionals that are marked by subjunctive morphology in both the antecedent and the consequent clauses and have an “irrealis” flavor. In recent years, this term has come under scrutiny...

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1 Introduction

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pp. 1-20

1.1 What Are Subjunctive Conditionals?

The scope of this book is what I will refer to as subjunctive conditionals. The term subjunctive conditionals has often been used in the philosophical and linguistic literature on English conditional sentences to refer to conditional...

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2 Temporal Mismatches in Subjunctive Conditionals

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pp. 21-52

2.1 Future Counterfactuals

As was mentioned in section 1.1, subjunctive conditionals in English are marked by what looks like past tense morphology in both the antecedent and the consequent clauses. However, subjunctive conditionals can be about the past, the present, or the future, as the examples in (1) illustrate.

(1) a. If you were there now, Mary would be...

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3 A Compositional Analysis

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pp. 53-116

3.1 The Facts

In chapter 2, I showed that whether a subjunctive conditional can be counterfactual or not does not correlate with the nature of the predicate in the antecedent (contra Arregui 2005). I argued that simple past subjunctive conditionals and past perfect subjunctive conditionals do not differ with respect to the counterfactuality of the antecedent per se; rather, they differ with respect to the...

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4 Presuppositions

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pp. 117-130

The view defended in this book is that, within the domain of subjunctive conditionals about the present or the future, the real difference is that between simple past ones and past perfect ones; moreover, this difference lies in the fact that, while simple past subjunctive conditionals require the presuppositions in the antecedent (and those in the consequent not entailed by the antecedent) to be...

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5 An Asymmetry between the Past and the Future

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pp. 131-136

My goal in this book has been to account for infelicitous instances of simple past subjunctive conditionals such as (1) and (2).

(1) John was sick yesterday and couldn’t go to the concert. Now he is well.
Too bad. #If he were sick tomorrow instead (of yesterday), he could go/could have gone.

(2) I called John...

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6 Conclusion

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pp. 137-140

When interpreting a subjunctive conditional (and a counterfactual in particular), how are we going to select the set of antecedent-worlds quantified over by the modal? This is the question that I set out to answer in this book. As the work of Lewis, Stalnaker, Kratzer, and others has shown, a notion of similarity is crucial in selecting the relevant set of worlds. The task for previous theories...

Notes

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pp. 141-150

References

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pp. 151-156

Index

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pp. 157-160

Other Works in the Series

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pp. 174-177