Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

Reflecting back over the years of working on this project, I can now see the process as a necessary stage for my personal and professional development. However, were it not for the constant supportive presence of many people in my life, the struggles of researching and writing this book would have overwhelmed me. I remained motivated by the collegial...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-15

During the early decades of the new American nation, intellectuals and cultural commentators were concerned with the question of what it meant to be American. More than a desire to differentiate themselves from Europeans, their anxiety arose out of the belief that the nation’s members lacked any commonalities beyond the shared revolutionary...

read more

1. Insecurity and Nationalism: The Call to Create a Unified American Music Culture

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-41

Insecurity pervaded the new American nation. According to late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century cultural commentators, America’s lack of a unified national culture potentially threatened the success of the republican experiment. As a result, many American writers called explicitly for the identification, creation, and support of a national...

read more

2. The Threat of Diversity: The Lower Mississippi River Valley as a Case Study

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-68

The region of the lower Mississippi River Valley is a particularly fruitful place to use as a case study to examine the interrelated issues of ethnic and racial diversity and insecure national attachment within the new nation. Between 1800 and 1860, this region moved from a contested borderland, to American territory, and finally into statehood...

read more

3. The War of the Quadrilles: Ethnic Loyalty and American Patriotism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 69-106

The lower Mississippi River Valley between 1800 and 1860 remained tenuously if increasingly attached to the United States, while home to a markedly diverse and dynamic population. During this era, many commentators, working to create a unified national culture, called to strengthen the ties with regions previously unattached to the nation...

read more

4. “Other” Musicians: Ethnic Expression, Public Music, and Familiarizing the Foreign

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-141

The music culture of the lower Mississippi River Valley revealed contentious diversity during the first half of the nineteenth century. Ethnic and racially specific organizations flourished in the region, which used music to strengthen and redefine their group identities. Suggesting changes that affected the country in general, this regional population searched...

read more

5. Bounding Ethnicity: The Creation and Consumption of Ethnic Music Genres

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 142-172

On the Fourth of July, 1835, organizers of the day’s events in New Orleans made a change to the parade route. In previous years, the festivities culminated with speeches and patriotic ceremonies outside the Catholic cathedral at the Place d’Armes. This year, the pomp would end outside the new Presbyterian church; it was less than a mile away, but...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-178

The political and cultural founders of the new American nation were never able to solidify a unifying national culture that extended beyond a shared revolutionary heritage. As a result of this failure, the memory of the Revolution remained the strongest cultural tie that bound the diverse people of this vast land together, both ideologically and through...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-198

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-242

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 243-250