In this Book

Degraded Work
summary

Critics on the left and the right typically agree that globalization, the loss of manufacturing jobs, and the expansion of the service sector have led to income inequality and rising numbers of low-paying jobs with poor working conditions.

In Degraded Work, Marc Doussard demonstrates that this decline in wages and working conditions is anything but the unavoidable result of competitive economic forces. Rather, he makes the case that service sector and other local-serving employers have boosted profit with innovative practices to exploit workers, demeaning their jobs in new ways—denying safety equipment, fining workers for taking scheduled breaks, requiring unpaid overtime—that go far beyond wage cuts. Doussard asserts that the degradation of service work is a choice rather than an inevitability, and he outlines concrete steps that can be taken to help establish a fairer postindustrial labor market.

Drawing on fieldwork in Chicago, Degraded Work examines changes in two industries in which inferior job quality is assumed to be intrinsic: residential construction and food retail. In both cases, Doussard shows how employers degraded working conditions as part of a successful and intricate strategy to increase profits. Arguing that a growing service sector does not have to mean growing inequality, Doussard proposes creative policy and organizing opportunities that workers and advocates can use to improve job quality despite the overwhelming barriers to national political action.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Introduction: The Boom in Poorly Paid and Precarious Jobs
  2. pp. vii-xviii
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  1. 1. New Inequalities: The Deterioration of Local-Serving Industries
  2. pp. 1-22
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  1. 2. Beyond Low Wages: The Problem of Degraded Work
  2. pp. 23-48
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  1. 3. The City That Sweats Work: Growth and Inequality in Post-Fordist Chicago
  2. pp. 49-80
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  1. 4. Oases in the Midst of Deserts: How Food Retailers Thrive in Disinvested Neighborhoods
  2. pp. 81-106
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  1. 5. “They’re Happy to Have a Job”: Midsize Supermarkets and Degraded Work
  2. pp. 107-142
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  1. 6. Building Degradation: Dangerous Work and Falling Pay during a Construction Boom
  2. pp. 143-170
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  1. 7. A Perfectly Flexible Workforce: Day Labor in a Precarious Industry
  2. pp. 171-202
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  1. 8. New Answers to New Problems: The Creative Work of Reversing Degradation
  2. pp. 203-224
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  1. Conclusion: Building a Fair Labor Market in Postmanufacturing Economies
  2. pp. 225-236
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 237-240
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 241-246
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 247-262
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 263-276
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