Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-7

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A Note on Terminology

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pp. vii-viii

When discussing migrants who are variously characterized as illegal, irregular, unauthorized, undocumented, nonstatus, clandestine, sans papières, sin papeles, and so on, word choices are never neutral. Rather, they reflect specific histories and political perspectives in a deeply polarized...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-29

In the 1990s, Ireland became transformed from a nation drained by centuries of emigration into what U.S. investment firm Morgan Stanley dubbed the “Celtic Tiger,” a destination that was sought out by migrants from around the world.1 They included not only workers from...

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1. Shifting Boundaries through Discourses of Childbearing

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pp. 31-53

National, colonial, and racial relationships have historically depended on discourses about women’s sexed bodies to establish hierarchies of differences. Actual women’s bodies were often studied, exhibited, or otherwise used to affirm and naturalize these hierarchies...

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2. Counternarratives of Migration Law and Childbearing

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pp. 55-85

Minister for justice John O’Donoghue’s remarks, analyzed in chapter 1, reflect the viewpoint of global northern state officials who consider unauthorized human migration across international borders to be a very serious problem. The remarks also reflect and...

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3. Baby Gives Birth to Parents: Direct Provision and Subject Formation

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pp. 87-123

This chapter describes the emergence of the direct provision and dispersal systems through which asylum seekers are provided with lodging, food, and health care while waiting for their asylum claims to be decided. Unlike the regular welfare system, direct provision does...

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4. The “Right to Life of the Unborn” and Migration Controls

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pp. 125-147

In January 2002 Ms. I.A.O., a thirty-two-year-old Nigerian citizen, made headlines in Ireland when she appealed to the High Court to prevent her deportation to Nigeria on the ground that she was pregnant. Her solicitor, deploying pro-life rhetoric, claimed that her deportation...

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5. Reproductive Futurism and the Temporality of Migration Control

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pp. 149-174

In March 2004 the minister for justice announced that voters would be asked to amend the constitution by removing the automatic entitlement to citizenship for any child born in Ireland, north or south. Newborn children who did not have at least one parent who was an Irish...

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6. From Childbearing to Multiple Sexuality and Migration Struggles

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pp. 175-189

This book has tracked how pregnancy and migrant status became interwoven through panics over illegal immigration that expanded the numbers of migrants who would become designated as illegal while at the same time refashioning social, economic, and geopolitical...

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Conclusion

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pp. 191-209

Judith Butler calls for scholarship and activisms “focused on opposition to state violence and its capacity to produce, exploit, and distribute precarity for the purposes of profit and territorial defense.”1 As she describes and as this book demonstrates, effective opposition requires...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 211-214

Even when there is only one author name on the cover, every book is a collaborative project. This book would not have been possible without generous support, practical assistance, and inspiration from many people. Warmest thanks to the migrants who shared aspects of their daily...

Notes

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pp. 215-287

Index

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pp. 289-299