Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-7

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-11

Books do not write themselves, and as an author, I am indebted to a number of individuals and institutions without whose help this volume would remain a vague idea in my head. Many thanks to my mentors in this process who thoughtfully read pieces of the project, especially Thomas Scanlan...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-10

Like many black people growing up in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s, I always seemed to have Asian culture in my house. From kung fu and samurai movies to anime, Asian culture wove itself into the fabric of my cultural imagination. Looking back as an academic, I realize that my...

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1. Afro-Asian Cultural Production and the Rise of the Global Culture

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pp. 11-39

In 2003, The Studio Museum of Harlem sponsored the Black Belt exhibition and produced a catalog whose front cover featured a bright yellow background surrounding a grainy picture of Jim Kelley, the African American martial artist who appeared in Bruce Lee’s 1973 film, Enter the Dragon and later starred...

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2. “You Can Stay at My Crib, I Will Show You My ’Hood”: Interethnic Male Friendship

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pp. 40-93

Bruce Lee’s 1973 film Enter the Dragon reflects a cross-cultural dynamic against the backdrop of the transnational, even in its conception and production. Michael Allin, the film’s screenwriter, remembers that he was conscious of “creating an international movie that would present Bruce...

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3. “Scheming, Treacherous, and Out for Revenge”: Ethnic Imperialism

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pp. 94-136

While Bruce Lee’s Enter the Dragon prefigures a theme of Afro-Chinese male friendship, The Chinese Connection (1972) (also known as Fist of Fury) interrogates a theme of ethnic imperialism. Set against the backdrop of Shanghai in 1908, tensions between Japan and China drive the...

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4. “Some Things Never Change, and Some Things Do”: Interethnic Confict and Solidarity

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pp. 137-185

While Bruce Lee’s The Chinese Connection deals with ethnic imperialism by centralizing the antagonisms between the Japanese and Chinese in early-twentieth-century Shanghai, The Big Boss (1971), his first film, examines intra- and interethnic conflict as well as solidarity. In doing so,...

Notes

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pp. 187-205

Bibliography

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pp. 207-216

Index

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pp. 217-222