Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

...Baltimore, Maryland, has been seen as a “town of contradictions” attributed to its geography and its unusual history in the United States narrative. Maryland was the only Catholic colony at the time of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and as a border state it came to link the industrializing North with the slave-owning South. Before the Civil War, Baltimore was a major industrial city that contained slaves while the...

read more

CHAPTER ONE: The Formation of a Branch and the Early Campaigns

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-45

...The black bourgeoisie has been intimately linked to the embryonic stages of local NAACP branches across the United States. A cursory glance at any branch in the 1910s to the 1930s reveals lawyers, physicians, religious ministers, and other middle-class professions, such as dentists, teachers, and newspaper proprietors, as mainstay of branch membership. Such people...

read more

CHAPTER TWO: Class and Gender and Early Civil Rights

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 46-75

...inquiry in twentieth century African American studies. Women’s activism being defined as “community bridge leaders” and broadly not undertaking the formal leadership positions of the civil rights movement (instead, organizing between groups and individuals to build complex social and professional networks) has dominated the discussion of black women and definitions of leadership. My own work on female campaigners in Louisiana, Invisible Activists, built upon these key concepts. Baltimore leadership...

read more

CHAPTER THREE: Leadership and Dr. Lillie M. Jackson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-108

...Lillie May Jackson became president of the Baltimore branch of the NAACP in 1935. She remained in that post until January 1970. This was exceptional for longevity of tenure and that a woman led a major branch from the New Deal to the end of the civil rights movement. She did this by being a charismatic and dominating personality, characteristics that tend to be associated with male leadership, and by creating an organization of...

read more

CHAPTER FOUR: Youth Activism and the NAACP

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-140

...How to organize and sustain a youth wing of the NAACP was a perennial problem for the national office and its local affiliates. Firstly, it was an issue of how to attract younger people into an organization dominated by adults and to train them in activist tactics. Secondly, it was the issue of the relationship of the youth wing of the NAACP with the adult branch that, in many ways, had parallels with local adult branch tensions...

read more

CHAPTER FIVE: The Age of Brown and Agnew

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-168

...Entering the civil rights era, the Baltimore NAACP branch proved itself an essential part of the national strategy to attain civic and educational equality. Its robust local activism meant that it was in a position to push Maryland into being the “first state south of the Mason-Dixon Line” to accept the...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-175

...On December 16, 1969, the Baltimore branch of the NAACP held its first unpredictable election for the post of president in the 55 years of its existence. Lillie Jackson was 80 years old and had finally decided it was time to retire from frontline NAACP activism. But the family ambition remained and she wished for control of the branch to be transferred to her second daughter, Juanita Mitchell, who was most active in civil...

Appendices

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 176-178

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-214

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-224

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-235