Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

...A generous grant from the Fritz Thyssen Foundation enabled me to carry out research in the Herzog Ernst Bibliothek in Gotha, Germany, especially for chapter 1. A similarly generous grant for junior faculty from the Trustees’ Council of Penn Women provided additional research support and paid for many reproductions, some of which I have happily been able to include in the following pages. A research leave for junior faculty...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

...vocabulary fail to obscure Heidegger’s shrill tone. Styled as a conversation between friends, Heidegger’s anti-romance, anti-novel tirade has long been identified as a foundational text for the history of the German novel. It has been reprinted, excerpted, collected in anthologies, quoted by scholars, and read by generations of Germanisten as arguably the first full-blown German-language theory of the...

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1. Fashion Restructures the Literary Field

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pp. 15-61

...In 1654, poet Friedrich von Logau (1605–1655) briefly commented on an ageold problem: the willy-nilly proliferation of books. Unlike Logau, others had already spilled quantities of ink on such ubiquity. Gutenberg’s invention had, they groused, made a bad problem worse. Every fool believed his scribblings to merit wider circulation, Erasmus—and many subsequently—had noted...

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2. Curing the French Disease

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pp. 62-106

...As the seventeenth century drew to a close, fashion turned up in a new French ensemble: gallantry. “The Character of a town-gallant” appeared in 1675 in London; but it might just as well have been published in a number of other cities or even towns where fashion now reigned. The gallant had become a stock character, strutting and preening his way across English, Dutch, French, and German...

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3. 1688: The Roman Becomes Both Poetical and Popular

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pp. 107-146

...Poetry). The work was a compendious survey spanning two volumes, intended perhaps for students such as those Rotth knew at the Gymnasium in Halle that he directed. Rotth’s treatment of the Roman, like many other discussions of the genre then percolating across Europe, drew extensively on Pierre Daniel Huet’s...

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4. 1696: Bringing the Roman to Market

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pp. 147-183

...By 1696, August Bohse (1661–1742) had made a name for himself: Talander. It was a pseudonym designed to evoke romance. With pride of place on title pages printed in Leipzig, Frankfurt, Dresden, or “Cologne,” many printers’ favorite fake place of publication, the name Talander summoned up visions of gallant French fictions. Perhaps, readers were meant to guess, the name originated in the volumes...

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Conclusion: Robinson Crusoe Sails on the European Market

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pp. 184-206

...In 1723, Johann Jakob Bodmer (1698–1783) and Johann Jakob Breitinger (1701– 1776) enumerated a list of thirty-five must-have titles to stock a lady’s library. The Swiss Bodmer and Breitinger, famous figures of the German Enlightenment, wrote from Zurich under the pseudonyms Dürer and Holbein. Their curriculum...

Bibliography

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pp. 207-234

Index

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pp. 235-248