Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

The publication of this book can be attributed to the academic and personal support shown to me over the last six years. This project began as a seminar paper and a dissertation at the University of Maryland, was revised when I was an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Indiana University–Purdue University ...

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Introduction: The Making of Militants

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pp. 1-23

On the day of Pres. Woodrow Wilson’s second inauguration, marchers sloshed through the soggy streets of Washington, D.C. The daunting weather did not stop the ceremonial parade or discourage the growing crowds. One report noted that “[i]n spite of steady and drenching rain, thousands of people congregated about the White House” ...

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1. Women, Citizenship, and US Nationalism

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pp. 24-52

Months following the colonies’ spirited declaration of independence from Great Britain, the people of New Jersey reached a breaking point. Patriotism wore thin as some considered taking up an amnesty proclamation offered by Lord Cornwallis after he and his British army set up camp in Elizabethtown. ...

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2. Mimesis and Political Ritual: The National Woman Suffrage Parade

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pp. 53-89

By 1913, the woman suffrage movement had gained some political strength and social appeal. Many western states had enacted woman suffrage, working-class women joined the movement in droves, and the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) had developed strong political ties. ...

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3. Mimesis and Third- Party Politics: The Woman’s Party

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pp. 90-120

The Congressional Committee’s woman suffrage parade of 1913 launched the militant branch of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) into the arena of national politics. As a mimetic enactment of the inauguration ritual, the parade created a vision of a mass movement and worked ...

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4. Mimesis and the Rhetorical Presidency: The Silent Sentinels

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pp. 121-148

The Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage (CUWS) waged a militant campaign against Democratic members of Congress between 1913 and 1916 in a national effort to pressure Democrats to support a federal woman suffrage amendment. Through its mimetic adoption of third-party strategies and the subsequent formation ...

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5. Mimesis and US Internationalism: Statue Protests and the “Watch Fires of Freedom”

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pp. 149-171

On January 9, 1918, less than two months after the Sentinels were released from prison, President Wilson advised a committee of Democrats to vote for the federal woman suffrage amendment “as an act of right and justice.”1 The following day, two key deliberative moments took place: the House of Representatives ...

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Afterword: “Suffrage Leaders”

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pp. 172-190

By August 1920, Tennessee and North Carolina were the suffragists’ last hopes for ratification—and a majority of North Carolina’s representatives stood in opposition to the woman suffrage amendment. A Supreme Court decision allowed Tennessee’s Democratic governor, Albert H. Roberts, to call a special legislative session on August 9. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. 191-192

Notes

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pp. 193-264

Bibliography

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pp. 265-295

Index

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pp. 296-303