Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-9

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Editor’s Preface

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pp. ix-15

While doing research in the 1990s for a history of John G. Walker’s Texas Division in the American Civil War, I came upon a document that had been examined by previous researchers but was not widely known among non-specialists in the war west of the Mississippi River. General Walker himself, shortly after the conflict ended, had written...

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EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: The General and His History

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pp. 1-32

When Walt Whitman wrote in 1882 that “the real war will never get in the books,” he could not have known that, over the next century, fifty thousand books on the American Civil War would be published. And in the following thirty years, thousands more volumes, examining and...

Original Title Page

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pp. 33-34

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Mrs. Walker’s Preface

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pp. 35-36

This partial history of the campaigns of the Trans-Mississippi Department was written by my husband the late Gen. Major-General John G. Walker, C.S.A. in London, England, at the close of the Civil War when the events which he narrates were fresh in his mind, & the feelings...

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CHAPTER 1. [No chapter title]

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pp. 37-46

In order to afford the reader a clearer understanding of the events of the last three years of the war, west of the Mississippi, it will be useful to review briefly the occurrences of 1861 and ’62. Missouri, the most populous of the States west of the Mississippi, although peopled largely by emigration from the slave-holding states of Virginia...

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CHAPTER 2. Operations in the Trans-Mississippi States in 1862

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pp. 47-83

In the early Spring of this year the Federal Army, twenty thousand strong, under Major General [Samuel R.] Curtis, was put in motion from St. Louis for the invasion of Arkansas via South Western Missouri.1 Price, who during the winter had occupied that portion of the latter State, with his headquarters at Springfield, rapidly fell back into Arkansas...

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CHAPTER 3. Military Operations West of the Mississippi during the Year 1864

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pp. 84-104

To enable the reader more clearly to understand what follows it will [be] useful to bear in mind the strength and relative situation of the Federal and Confederate armies at the opening of the season for active operations in the Spring of ’64. As has already been said Gen. Franklin [should be Frederick...

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CHAPTER 4. The Arkansas Campaign and the Battle of the Saline

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pp. 105-113

Leaving Gen. Banks to pursue his retreat, followed by the diminished forces of Gen. Taylor, let us turn our attention in another direction. Gen. Steele was still at Camden, in ignorance of the defeat of Banks, but such was the condition of the roads and the failing strength of his draft animals upon which he depended to bring his subsistence from the Arkansas...

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CHAPTER 5. The Federal Evacuation of Red River Valley

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pp. 114-120

We left General Taylor in pursuit of Banks’ flying and demoralized army, and we will now resume the narrative of the events that resulted in its expulsion from the valley of the Red River. With so considerable an army at his disposal, still numbering quite thirty thousand men..

Bibliography

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pp. 121-130

Index

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pp. 131-135