Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. iii-iv

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Introduction

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pp. v-x

I started to write this book neither as someone who has been silenced, nor as someone who is mute. I started to write this book as someone whose voice is often lost in the thoughts moulding the audible voices, those which supposedly articulate more clearly what I have to say. ...

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Chapter 1 - (In) Security and Knowledge Creation

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pp. 1-20

The term security changes through time. McSweeney (1999:14-15) notes that etymologically the noun “security” has evolved from a positive, comforting term to a negative one. From being a psychological condition of the care-free into which we are easily lulled—“mortals chiefest enemy” as the three witches describe it in Macbeth ...

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Chapter 2 - Creativity and Recognition

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pp. 21-56

Montesquieu (1976:157) stresses the links between, ideas, ideas and people, emotions and ideas, biology and aesthetic when he argues that: “All ideas are linked to one another, and they are link to ourselves. If it were known in how many ways a sentiment is held in place within a man’s brain, ...

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Chapter 3 - Space and Postcoloniality

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pp. 57-102

The common ground21 20th century scientific approaches to the question of society and space has been that the form of the environment is the by-product of social processes meaning that the space has no existence in its own and that there is no question of space having laws in of its own (Hillier, 2008:221). ...

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Chapter 4 - Science and Knowing

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pp. 103-118

Animals and humans have only two main mechanisms for adapting to their environment, the first one is biological evolution and the second one is learning (Kandel and Mack, 2003:273).In matters of learning, it is important to note that scientific reasoning differs from heuristics. ...

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Chapter 5 - Human and Environmental Cognition

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pp. 119-146

To think globally refers to seeing the world as a knowable entity, namely a single interconnected whole that lacks in a sense a secure stasis of maps, parlour globes, or pre-Darwinian cosmologies (Edward, 2010b:2-3). For Schneider (2009:3) global changes (e.g. growing number of people using technology or increase in the per capital level of consumption) ...

Bibliography

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pp. 147-170

Back cover

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pp. 188-188