Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Abbreviations

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

With one estimate of 500 million adherents worldwide, converted in the course of one century, Pentecostalism has become one of the main branches of Christianity.1 A popular theory locates the origin of Pentecostalism in a 1906 revival meeting at the Azusa Street Mission in Los Angeles. ...

Part One. Interdisciplinary Perspectives

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1. Varieties, Taxonomies, and Definitions

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pp. 13-29

This chapter is about defining Pentecostalism/s, in view of the fact that definitions are often static and prone to generate confusion. It seeks to give some clarity to the discussion of ways in which Pentecostalism can be described and analyzed, and it tries to offer direction through the maze of different shifting forms of Pentecostalism/s. ...

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2. Essentialist and Normative Approaches

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pp. 30-50

In this chapter the role of essentialist and normative elements in the study of Pentecostalism is discussed. These elements are part of any academic effort. In studying Pentecostalism, essentialist and normative tendencies may also stem from the identity of Pentecostalism itself and from its perception by others. ...

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3. The Cultural Turn

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pp. 51-73

“Cultural studies” and similar designations mark a diverse field of related theoretical approaches, sometimes labeled “cultural turn,” that have deeply influenced the humanities and social sciences in the past three decades.1 In general, studies on Pentecostal and Charismatic movements have not taken up these approaches in their research design, ...

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4. Gender and Power

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pp. 74-92

The goal of this chapter is to comment on the scholarship on gender in the Pentecostal movement and to provide some case contextualization from my own ethnographic field research with Pentecostals in Colombia. Since I began to explore the gendered nature of Pentecostal conversion in the beginning of the 1980s, ...

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5. Conversion Narratives

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pp. 93-112

The emphasis in this chapter is on how people tell the story of their conversion. I follow a historical and phenomenological approach to the conversion narrative, analyzing it as a social construction and not necessarily as a factual description of the main events in an individual’s life. ...

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6. Pentecostalism and Globalization

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pp. 113-130

The title of this chapter couples two big terms around each of which a huge scholarly field has evolved over the past two decades. In brief, the concept of globalization signals a departure from the metanarrative of modernization, according to which ‘development’ would eventually render the second (socialist) and third worlds more or less similar to the first world, the modern West.1 ...

Part Two. Social Sciences and Humanities

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7. Psychology of Religion

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pp. 133-155

The psychology of religion investigates religious beliefs, experiences, and behavior in relation to psychological concepts and theories. It analyzes the psychological representation and functioning of religious content in the individual. This perspective is useful for revealing and describing aspects of religion that may not be captured otherwise, ...

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8. Anthropology of Religion

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pp. 156-178

Mark Noll, discussing the early-twentieth-century emergence of Pentecostalism, refers to it as a development that “as is now well known, has had world historical significance.”1 It is fair to say that Noll is right on both counts: Pentecostalism has changed and is changing the global landscape in world historical ways, ...

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9. Sociology of Religion

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pp. 179-201

In the mid-1960s David Martin furthered the view that the prevailing sociological concept of secularization regrettably carried a strong ideological dimension—that religion was inevitably on the decline and, moreover, that this was to be welcomed. Put succinctly, humanity would eventually be liberated from the shackles of religion.1 ...

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10. Historical Approaches

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pp. 202-220

In 1981, at the commemoration of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Pentecostal Assembly of Amsterdam, an American missionary spoke about how the Pentecostal message had started in the United States and from there had come to Europe. The next speaker was Emmanuel Schuurman, the oldest living Dutch Pentecostal pioneer. ...

Part Three. Theology

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11. Pneumatologies in Systematic Theology

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pp. 223-244

The aim of this chapter is to look at the state of Pentecostal theology. Surveying the literature available, I was reminded of the important piece written by the leading Pentecostal systematician Frank Macchia in the revised edition of the New International Dictionary of Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements, titled “Theology, Pentecostal.”1 ...

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12. Missiology and the Interreligious Encounter

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pp. 245-267

Pentecostals have always been heavily involved in missions and hold missionaries in high esteem as extraordinary heroes of the faith.1 But they have traditionally not given as much thought to the topic of theology of religions, or interreligious dialogue and encounter, as to other theological loci.2 ...

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13. Practical Theology

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pp. 268-285

The discipline of practical theology is one that appears to be in constant redefinition in recent times, although there might at last be some consensus emerging. It was once regarded as the crown of theological study, placed toward the end of theological education for the ordained ministry. ...

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14. Ecumenism

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pp. 286-308

Ecumenism is a topic that many Pentecostals find difficult to discuss. This is in part because most Pentecostals know very little about the subject, often just enough to condemn it. When asked why they are opposed to ecumenism, their responses are often anecdotal. ...

Contributors

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pp. 309-310

Index

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pp. 311-326

Further Reading, Other Works in the Series

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pp. 336-338