In this Book

Subjectivity
summary
This innovative volume is an extended intellectual conversation about the ways personal lives are being undone and remade today. Examining the ethnography of the modern subject, this preeminent group of scholars probes the continuity and diversity of modes of personhood across a range of Western and non-Western societies. Contributors consider what happens to individual subjectivity when stable or imagined environments such as nations and communities are transformed or displaced by free trade economics, terrorism, and war; how new information and medical technologies reshape the relation one has to oneself; and which forms of subjectivity and life possibilities are produced against a world in pieces. The transdisciplinary conversation includes anthropologists, historians of science, psychologists, a literary critic, a philosopher, physicians, and an economist. The authors touch on how we think and write about contingency, human agency, and ethics today.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Other Works in the Series, Copyright
  2. pp. ii-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-vii
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. ix-xi
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  1. Introduction: Rethinking Subjectivity
  2. pp. 1-23
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  1. PART I. TRANSFORMATIONS IN SOCIAL EXPERIENCE AND SUBJECTIVITY
  2. pp. 25-33
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  1. 1. The Vanishing Subject: The Many Faces of Subjectivity
  2. pp. 34-51
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  1. 2. The Experiential Basis of Subjectivity: How Individuals Change in the Context of Societal Transformation
  2. pp. 52-65
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  1. 3. How the Body Speaks: Illness and the Lifeworld among the Urban Poor
  2. pp. 66-97
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  1. 4. Anthropological Observation and Self-Formation
  2. pp. 98-118
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  1. PART II. POLITICAL SUBJECTS
  2. pp. 119-127
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  1. 5. Hamlet in Purgatory
  2. pp. 128-154
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  1. 6. America’s Transient Mental Illness: A Brief History of the Self-Traumatized Perpetrator
  2. pp. 155-178
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  1. 7. Violence and the Politics of Remorse: Lessons from South Africa
  2. pp. 179-233
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  1. PART III. MADNESS AND SOCIAL SUFFERING
  2. pp. 235-242
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  1. 8. The Subject of Mental Illness: Psychosis, Mad Violence, and Subjectivity in Indonesia
  2. pp. 243-272
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  1. 9. The “Other” of Culture in Psychosis: The Ex-Centricity of the Subject
  2. pp. 273-314
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  1. 10. Hoarders and Scrappers: Madness and the Social Person in the Interstices of the City
  2. pp. 315-340
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  1. PART IV. LIFE TECHNOLOGIES
  2. pp. 341-351
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  1. 11. Whole Bodies, Whole Persons? Cultural Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Biology
  2. pp. 352-361
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  1. 12. The Medical Imaginary and the Biotechnical Embrace: Subjective Experiences of Clinical Scientists and Patients
  2. pp. 362-380
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  1. 13. “To Be Freed from the Infirmity of (the) Age”: Subjectivity, Life-Sustaining Treatment, and Palliative Medicine
  2. pp. 381-396
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  1. 14. A Life: Between Psychiatric Drugs and Social Abandonment
  2. pp. 397-421
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  1. Epilogue. To Live with What Would Otherwise Be Unendurable: Return(s) to Subjectivities
  2. pp. 423-446
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 447-464
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  1. Production Notes
  2. pp. 465-465
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