Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, About the Series, Other Works in the Series, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

...I owe the deepest thanks to the friends and colleagues who have read and off ered comments on earlier versions of these chapters: Robert Adlington, Amy Beal, Jorge Boehringer, Eric Drott, Bernard Gendron, Bill Girard, Monica Hairston, Fred Ho, Branden Joseph, Liz Kotz, Tracy McMullen, Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, Barry Shank, and Ben Young. I am particularly indebted to Ellie Hisama, Sherrie Tucker...

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Introduction: What Was Experimentalism?

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pp. 1-19

...This book tells the stories of four disastrous confrontations within the world of New York experimentalism in 1964, plus one more about the extension of experimentalist techniques out of the city’s avant-garde community and into the foreign realm of popular music a few years later. In February, the New York Philharmonic gave their notorious performance...

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1. When Orchestras Attack!: John Cage Meets the New York Philharmonic

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pp. 20-64

...Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6. The audience returned from intermission to hear the conductor, Leonard Bernstein, deliver one of his famous concert talks from the podium. The lengthy address — it lasted over eleven minutes — perhaps indicated his anxiety concerning what was about to unfold. He began, “This week we are presenting the last group of avant-garde works in this series,” and was answered...

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2. Demolish Serious Culture!: Henry Flynt Meets the New York Avant-Garde

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pp. 65-101

...On the evening of April 29, 1964, a group calling itself Action Against Cultural Imperialism (AACI) mounted a picket line in front of Town Hall on West 43rd Street in New York.1 Inside the hall took place a “gala concert” sponsored by the West German government, with music by Karlheinz Stockhausen, Hans Werner Henze, Paul Hindemith, and a few others. The performers included Stockhausen, the pianist David...

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3. October or Thermidor?: The Jazz Composers Guild Meets New York

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pp. 102-139

...In the late afternoon of October 1, 1964, Bill Dixon sat in the home of two friends on West 91st Street after a long week of hard work.1 The composer and trumpeter had been busy organizing a four-night festival of adventurous music to be called the October Revolution in Jazz and soon to take place across the street at the Cellar Café. Earlier that year, between May and September, Dixon had programmed...

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4. Murder by Cello: Charlotte Moorman Meets John Cage

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pp. 140-176

...Moorman (1933 – 91) persuaded him to allow her to reprise the work as the centerpiece of her Second Annual Avant Garde Festival. (The Festival also included a week of other performances that year.) Moorman had been living in New York since 1957, and by 1964 she had emerged as a catalytic force in New York experimentalism, owing to her considerable prowess in organizing and promoting large events...

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Epilogue: Experimentalism Meets (Iggy) Pop

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pp. 177-198

...In the absence of evidence to the contrary, one might mistake these statements to be descriptions of the late-1960s, early-1970s band the Stooges, whom the writer Scott Isler once labeled “the reductio ad absurdum of rock ’n’ roll.” 4 Some years later, the Stooges’ front man and leader, Iggy Pop (né James Osterberg, 1947) echoed the comments of these New York critics when he described his band’s early music: “Torture, it basically started out as torture. And then went from there...

Notes

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pp. 199-250

Works Cited

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pp. 251-272

Index

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pp. 273-283

Production Notes

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pp. 284-284