In this Book

Chinese Religiosities
summary
The long twentieth century in China and Taiwan has seen both a dramatic process of state-driven secularization and modernization and a vigorous revival of contemporary religious life. Chinese Religiosities explores the often vexed relationship between the modern Chinese state and religious practice. The essays in this comprehensive, multidisciplinary collection cover a wide range of traditions, including Buddhism, Daoism, Islam, Confucianism, Protestantism, Falungong, popular religion, and redemptive societies.

Contributors: José Cabezón, Prasenjit Duara, Ryan Dunch, Dru C. Gladney, Vincent Goossaert, Ji Zhe, Ya-pei Kuo, Richard Madsen, Rebecca Nedostup, David Palmer, Benjamin Penny, Mayfair Mei-hui Yang

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-5
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  1. Contents, Acknowledgments
  2. pp. v-viii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-40
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  1. Part I. Religious Approaches to Citizenship: The Traffic between Religious Orders and the Secular National Order
  2. pp. 41-42
  1. 1. Religion and Citizenship in China and the Diaspora
  2. pp. 43-64
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  1. 2. Redeploying Confucius: The Imperial State Dreams of the Nation, 1902–1911
  2. pp. 65-84
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  1. Part II. State Discourse and the Transformation of Religious Communities
  2. pp. 85-86
  1. 3. Ritual Competition and the Modernizing Nation-State
  2. pp. 87-112
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  1. 4. Heretical Doctrines, Reactionary Secret Societies, Evil Cults: Labeling Heterodoxy in Twentieth-Century China
  2. pp. 113-134
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  1. 5. Animal Spirits, Karmic Retribution, Falungong, and the State
  2. pp. 135-154
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  1. 6. Christianity and “Adaptation to Socialism”
  2. pp. 155-178
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  1. 7. Islam and Modernity in China: Secularization or Separatism?
  2. pp. 179-206
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  1. Part III. The Reinvention and Control of Religious Institutions
  2. pp. 207-208
  1. 8. Republican Church Engineering: The National Religious Associations in 1912 China
  2. pp. 209-232
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  1. 9. Secularization as Religious Restructuring: Statist Institutionalization of Chinese Buddhism and Its Paradoxes
  2. pp. 233-260
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  1. 10. State Control of Tibetan Buddhist Monasticism in the People’s Republic of China
  2. pp. 261-292
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  1. Part IV. Taiwan and Transnational Chinese Religiosity
  2. pp. 293-294
  1. 11. Religious Renaissance and Taiwan’s Modern Middle Classes
  2. pp. 295-322
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  1. 12. Goddess across the Taiwan Strait: Matrifocal Ritual Space, Nation-State, and Satellite Television Footprints
  2. pp. 323-348
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 349-376
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 377-436
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  1. Glossary and Chinese Proper Names
  2. pp. 437-450
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 451-454
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 455-464
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