Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. iii-v

Contents

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pp. vii-vii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvi

This book makes several bold theoretical claims. Moving from the more specific to the more general, they are: identity is based on social experience, not cultural ideas or ancestry; cultural meanings and social power constitute two distinct, though interacting, systems that affect human behavior and societies differently; demographic forces such as migration ...

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1. What’s in a Name? Culture, Identity, and the “Taiwan Problem”

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pp. 1-34

At the turn of the twenty-first century, Taiwan is a global hot spot. The events and rhetoric surrounding Taiwan’s second presidential election in March 2000 raised fears that tensions in the region might result in actual warfare among nuclear powers. Why is Taiwan—with a stable, democratic government and a strong economy—considered a threat to world ...

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2. Where Did the Aborigines Go? Reinstating Plains Aborigines in Taiwan’s History

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pp. 35-65

Variations of Taiwan’s previous narrative of unfolding as a Han domain promoted Taiwanese identity as a Han identity. Thus these narratives open in the seventeenth century, when Han immigration to Taiwan began in earnest, and minimize the presence and significance of the many Aborigine groups who lived on Taiwan when the Han arrived. They tell of ...

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3. “We Savages Didn’t Bind Feet”: Culture, Colonial Intervention, and Long-Route Identity Change

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pp. 66-133

In villages along the edge of the foothills to the central mountains— Toushe, Jibeishua, and Longtian (see figure 2, at the beginning of the book)—descendants of plains Aborigines maintained an Aborigine identity in spite of some intermarriage with Hoklo men and significant cultural and linguistic changes.1 They maintained this identity through the ...

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4. “Having a Wife is Better than Having a God”: Ancestry, Governmental Power, and Short-Route Identity Change

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pp. 134-165

Between the early seventeenth century, when the Dutch established theircolonial mission, and the early eighteenth century, when the Qing regimebegan to loosen its restrictions on the migration of women and familiesto Taiwan, Taiwan’s southwestern plain transformed.1 Formerly a terri-tory of networked Aborigine villages, home to a flourishing trading site...

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5. “They Came With Their Hands Tied Behind Their Backs”: Forced Migrations, Identity Changes, and State Classification in Hubei

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pp. 166-210

Identity and culture changed in China, in ways similar to Taiwan.1 In the mountainous Enshi prefecture of present-day southwestern Hubei Province, which separates the plains of the Middle Yangzi River region from the Sichuan basin (see figure 20), there have been periodic waves of forced immigration—mostly Han soldiers, farmers and laborers, and exiled convicts ...

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6. Theory and the Politics of Reunification: Understanding Past Choices and Future Options

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pp. 211-250

The “Taiwan problem”—the question of whether Taiwan should be a part of the Chinese nation or its own independent nation—is a political issue. Moreover, it is fundamentally an issue of identity. These statements are not contradictory, for, as we have seen, identity is political. A specific identity is formed by individuals who share common social experiences ...

Notes

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pp. 251-277

References

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pp. 279-301

Character List

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pp. 302-308

Index

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pp. 309-333

Production Notes

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pp. 334-334