Cover

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CONTENTS

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INTRODUCTION: Evangelical Christianity and the Problem of Difference

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pp. 1-14

In the spring of 1882, Fung Chak, a missionary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society (ABHMS), penned a letter to the organization’s Executive Board in New York City from his post in Portland, Oregon. Fung supervised the city’s Chinese Mission School and wrote ostensibly to galvanize support ...

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CHAPTER ONE: “A Grand and Awful Time”

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pp. 15-30

When delegates and officials of the American Baptist Home Mission Society (ABHMS) convened in Cleveland, Ohio, for their thirty-first annual meeting, a somber mood pervaded the proceedings. It was May 21, 1863, and there seemed to be precious little to celebrate for the members of the denomination’s...

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CHAPTER TWO: Faith and Hope

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pp. 31-64

The white missionary and black churchmen who met on December 1, 1865, in the basement of the Guion Hotel on Edenton Street in Raleigh had all traveled a long way. Henry Martin Tupper, a thirty-four-year-old Union Army veteran ...

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CHAPTER THREE: Callings

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pp. 65-98

The calls came from different places; the missions emanated from different institutions. In New York City, officials of the ABHMS offered Henry Martin Tupper a commission, which he received on July 3, 1865, to work among the freedpeople in the South....

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CHAPTER FOUR: Congregation

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pp. 99-131

Henry Martin Tupper’s optimism found its measure in ambition. Within a year of the first meeting of the American Baptist mission school in Raleigh, the northern missionary who headed the institution hoped to raise a building to house the school and a church—a permanent structure that would symbolize ...

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CHAPTER FIVE: Conflict and Community

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pp. 132-152

There seemed to be no such thing as a straight line for white missionaries or for black and Chinese mission participants. Mission theorists, officials, and advocates posited a linear equation to describe the progression from “heathen” to Christian American—merely add a mission education and ...

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CONCLUSION: Transformations

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pp. 153-165

In January 1899, Charles Meserve, the white president of Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, presented his annual report to the ABHMS. A single tragic event loomed large in Meserve’s report. Just two months earlier, the devastating race riot had ripped through Wilmington in the eastern part of the state,...

NOTES

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pp. 167-220

INDEX

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pp. 221-231

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. 233-237

Researching and writing a book may be solitary acts; the fruits of that labor most certainly accrue solely to the author. Yet this book is evidence that the broader process of scholarship is by no means carried out in isolation. Overlapping communities of friends, family, colleagues, and mentors all par-My research benefited greatly from the aid of archivists and librarians in ...