Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Tables and Figures

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pp. vii-viii

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

This book has been a long time in the making. It resulted from a growing awareness, over almost twenty years, of the importance of the Parmenides for the understanding of Plato’s mature metaphysics and of the gradual realization that nothing short of a line-by-line commentary could do justice to its intricacies and its far-reaching implications. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-40

Of all Plato’s dialogues, the Parmenides is notoriously the most difficult to interpret. Scholars of all periods have violently disagreed about its very aims and subject matter. The interpretations have ranged from reading the dialogue as an introduction to the whole of Platonic—and more often Neoplatonic—metaphysics1 ...

Parmenides

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Proem

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pp. 43-52

The pedigree of the story is very carefully established. Cephalus tells us what Antiphon told him that Pythodorus reported of the conversation between Parmenides, Zeno, and Socrates. The other dialogue in which we have such an elaborate framework is the Symposium, and there Plato seems to be very serious about Diotima’s speech, ...

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Part I: Aporia

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pp. 53-78

Χωρίς (130b2, b3, b4), ‘apart’, is used by the historical Parmenides when first introducing (illusory) plurality. (Cf. fr. 8.56.) True, it is Socrates who brings up the term in this discussion, at 129d7—but as one aspect or mode of the forms’ being. Socrates says he ‘would admire him wonderfully’ who would show forms both to be apart and to mix with each other. ...

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Part II: Euporia

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pp. 79-166

Parmenides’ method is now applied to his own hypothesis: the one, or (as Plato rephrases it) ‘if (the) one is’.1 So far, there is no difference between hypothesizing the one and hypothesizing that the one is. We do not yet have the distinction between an object (or the corresponding term) and a state of affairs (or the corresponding proposition). ...

Bibliography

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pp. 167-174

Index Locorum

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pp. 175-182

Index Nominum

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pp. 183-186

Index of Greek Words and Expressions

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pp. 187-188

General Index

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pp. 189-194