Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Notes to the Reader

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pp. xi-xii

...Throughout this book Japanese names have been rendered in Japanese style, family name first. Well-known literary figures and artists, however, are often referred to by their pseudonyms and not by their family names (e.g., Hiraga Gennai is “Gennai,” Ishikawa Ryu¯ sen is “Ryu¯ sen”). Edo-period authors often used several pseudonyms; in this case, alternate names are bracketed or given in the endnotes...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

...I have been extremely fortunate over the years to benefit from the counsel and criticism of a great many teachers, colleagues, and friends. Mary Elizabeth Berry introduced me to the study of Japanese history, and some years later supervised the dissertation upon which this book is based. Without her inspiration and guidance I would not have begun this project, much less finished it. Irwin Scheiner and Thomas C. Smith first sparked my interest in the early modern period...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-7

...By the middle of the Tokugawa period (1603–1868), literate people had access to a vast and varied selection of maps and geographical writings. As a result, those with the means to borrow or buy printed media could readily conjure up images of and information about an entity called, alternately, “Japan” (Nihon), “Great Japan” (Dai Nihon), “our realm”...

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Envisioning the Realm

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pp. 8-43

...The cartographer Phillip C. Muehrcke has observed that even a map of a “real” place can be seen as a “controlled fiction,” an act of creation as well as replication.1 This is an apt description of the administrative and commercial mapping of Japan in the Tokugawa period. For the shogunate as well as for the many commercial mapmakers and publishers, maps envisioned, created, and ultimately enshrined a new geographical, political, and social order. And insofar as nearly all...

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Annotating Japan

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pp. 44-68

...If, to paraphrase Foucault, maps create order through “a glance, an examination,” then travel accounts depend on language—specifically, upon narrative—to reveal the supposedly “hidden networks” that structure the naturalworld. But while maps tend to homogenize different types of information by conveying it in a single graphic dimension, travel accounts amplify spatial and cultural difference...

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Narrating Japan

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pp. 69-100

...Writers like Kaibara Ekiken reinvented the genre of travel writing in the early modern period to emphasize the importance of direct observation and clear description. Over the course of the eighteenth century, however, writers began to use the experience of travel to fashion themselves as opinionated authorities on a broad range of subjects, from geography to medicine to “foreign studies.” As they ventured...

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Imagining Japan, Inventing the World

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pp. 101-128

...As the works and lives of Kaibara Ekiken, Furukawa Kosho¯ ken, Tachibana Nankei, and others have shown, early modern travelers mapped Japanese culture as well as its topography in their desire to witness, analyze, and catalog difference. Despite their different intellectual inclinations and narrative strategies, they took their study...

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Remapping Japan

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pp. 129-172

...By disrupting the familiar order of famous and foreign places, fiction writers called into question the seemingly stable and natural connection between place and identity. In doing so, they not only parodied world geography, they also relativized familiar notions of spatial and cultural order. In works of satirical fiction dating from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, we...

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Conclusion

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pp. 173-178

...I began this book by suggesting that the history of mapping was a history of ideas. The preceding chapters have described a process through which those ideas came to be held, manipulated, and transformed by ever-greater numbers of people, and accrued multiple and multilayered meanings. In closing, I want to suggest how, in the mid-nineteenth century, the increasingly public ideas and images conveyed...

Notes

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pp. 179-210

Bibliography

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pp. 211-226

Index

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pp. 227-235