In this Book

summary
This innovative volume is the first collective effort by archaeologists and ethnographers to use concepts and models from human behavioral ecology to explore one of the most consequential transitions in human history: the origins of agriculture. Carefully balancing theory and detailed empirical study, and drawing from a series of ethnographic and archaeological case studies from eleven locations—including North and South America, Mesoamerica, Europe, the Near East, Africa, and the Pacific—the contributors to this volume examine the transition from hunting and gathering to farming and herding using a broad set of analytical models and concepts. These include diet breadth, central place foraging, ideal free distribution, discounting, risk sensitivity, population ecology, and costly signaling. An introductory chapter both charts the basics of the theory and notes areas of rapid advance in our understanding of how human subsistence systems evolve. Two concluding chapters by senior archaeologists reflect on the potential for human behavioral ecology to explain domestication and the transition from foraging to farming.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-7
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Foreword
  2. pp. xi-xii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Behavioral Ecology and the Transition from Hunting and Gathering to Agriculture
  2. pp. 1-21
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. A Future Discounting Explanation for the Persistence of a Mixed Foraging-Horticulture Strategy among the Mikea of Madagascar
  2. pp. 22-40
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Central Place Foraging and Food Production on the Cumberland Plateau, Eastern Kentucky
  2. pp. 41-62
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Aspects of Optimization and Risk During the Early Agricultural Period in Southeastern Arizona
  2. pp. 63-86
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. A Formal Model for Predicting Agriculture among the Fremont
  2. pp. 87-102
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. An Ecological Model for the Origins of Maize-Based Food Production on the Pacific Coast of Southern Mexico
  2. pp. 103-136
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. The Origins of Plant Cultivation and Domestication in the Neotropics: A Behavioral Ecological Perspective
  2. pp. 137-166
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Costly Signaling, the Sexual Division of Labor, and Animal Domestication in the Andean Highlands
  2. pp. 167-196
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Human Behavioral Ecology, Domestic Animals, and Land Use during the Transition to Agriculture in Valencia, Eastern Spain
  2. pp. 197-216
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. Breaking the Rain Barrier and the Tropical Spread of Near Eastern Agriculture into Southern Arabia
  2. pp. 217-236
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 11. The Emergence of Agriculture in New Guinea: A Model Of Continuity from Pre-Existing Foraging Practices
  2. pp. 237-264
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. The Ideal Free Distribution, Food Production, and the Colonization of Oceania
  2. pp. 265-288
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 13. Human Behavioral Ecology and the Transition to Food Production
  2. pp. 289-303
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 14. Agriculture, Archaeology, and Human Behavioral Ecology
  2. pp. 304-322
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. References
  2. pp. 323-380
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 381-394
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9780520932456
Print ISBN
9780520246478
MARC Record
OCLC
63813456
Pages
407
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.