Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

There is a perfect Merchant Ivory moment midway through Quartet, theirménage-à-trois story set in Paris in the 1920s. Beautiful, hapless Marya Zellihas wandered into the orbit of a powerful and urbane English couple. WhileH. J. Heidler (Alan Bates) prepares to make the inevitable move on his house-guest (after all, she is played in alluring if desolate fashion by Isabelle Adjani),...

read more

Setting the Scene

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-26

Robert Emmet Long: Merchant Ivory is known to be the independent film pro-duction team of the last few decades, achieving its success on its own, outsidethe Hollywood studio system—or maybe in defiance of it. But, in fact, whathas your experience with Hollywood been like? What sort of dealings have youJames Ivor y: There has been this idea—people have often spoken or written in...

read more

The Early Years

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-42

...James Ivory: Well, lots of American artists who have done all kinds of things have come from the most unlikely little American town; and have made their trek first from their little town to New York, and from New York to Europe, making their name along the way, or maybe even making it in Europe. I’m just one of those kinds of people. Long: You’ve said that Klamath...

read more

Documentaries, 1952–1972

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-64

...James Ivory: There weren’t that many, perhaps, but enough to make up a kind of subgenre. That was a time when people liked to make films about artists and works of art. One of the attractions was that they didn’t cost much money to make. You had to choose a theme carefully and then usually concentrate on one work of art, and explain it and analyze it. Your audience was in museums, schools, and once in a while in theaters. Those were the days when shorts were still shown along with a feature in art houses...

Feature Films

read more

India

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-116

...brought it back to New York to edit, and then I decided that I really needed to do more work on it, that I hadn’t got all I wanted—and at that point I met Ismail. I introduced him to some people here in New York who wanted to make a feature film in India. One of them was the anthropologist Gitel Steed. She had written a script called...

read more

America

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-196

...Long: What is touching about this group of characters is that they have such a tenuous life. They become civilized people only briefly, during a single day, and they are gone again, back into prehistory. Yet I don’t remember any reviewer commenting on this quality of group poignancy. I find it more touching than the decline and fall of Jolly Grimm...

read more

England

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 197-253

...Ivory:Well, his energy and good humor—a cameraman needs a large supply of both. And then he has a superlative technical grasp of everything; he’s an impeccable perfectionist, but at the same time, as I say, he has such high spirits, such energy. Nothing is too much for him, nothing is impossible. He will try anything you want, and I’ve worked...

read more

France

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 254-328

...Yes and no. The failure to have an exact understanding of the language is a drawback for me sometimes; my French ought by now to be more fluent, seeing that I’ve been going to France for half a century. I have a good ear, but I’m lazy; a pretty good accent, but a bad memory. On the other hand, it’s a real pleasure to work with a French crew—perhaps the greatest. In a very democratic way—not usual in England...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 329-338

Photography Credits

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 339-339