Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Other Works in the Series, Copyright

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

This book consists of the application of new questions to old data, and so the acknowledgments in my earlier book, Demography of the Dobe !Kung (Howell, 2000), apply to this one too, especially thanking the !Kung San people who made the fieldwork such a pleasure, and my colleagues from the Harvard Kalahari expedition of 1967–1969: ...

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1. Another Look at the !Kung: A Life History Approach

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pp. 1-18

In 1967 I was privileged to go to southern Africa to live with the !Kung Bushmen in the Kalahari desert. I was in the final stages of my Ph.D. in sociology at Harvard, and recently married to Richard Lee, who had already spent a year and a half living with the !Kung San people and learning their language. ...

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2. Life History Stages

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pp. 19-48

In my earlier account of the !Kung people (Howell, 1979, 2000), I organized the presentation around the standard demographic processes of death and birth, marriage, and migration, and presented the data in the framework of the ages that I estimated for individuals. ...

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3. Body Size and Growth

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pp. 49-82

One of the most distinctive features of the !Kung people is their small body size. They are short and slender and fine-boned. Many of the people are so thin that bones and muscles are readily seen through the skin, even though most of them seem to be healthy and vigorous. ...

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4. Calories Required

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pp. 83-106

Our task in this chapter is to estimate, for each age and sex group, how many calories are needed to support its members, so that we can consider the relationship between calories produced and consumed.1 We are constructing a framework to understand the production and consumption of calories over the life span, ...

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5. Caloric Productivity and Caloric Balance

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pp. 107-126

The !Kung traditionally eat the fruits of nature, hunting and gathering the wild foods of the environment without planting, weeding, or tending crops or animals. As we saw in the last chapter, they do a lot of work to get that food, and many aspects of that work influence their overall way of life. ...

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6. Caloric Balance and Residential Units: Waterholes, Living Groups, Households

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pp. 127-156

The first section of this book has been spent constructing a framework of life history of the !Kung, focusing on body size and the production and requirements of calories. The units of analysis have been individuals over the life span, on the one hand, and the total population, weighing the individuals in each age segment ...

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7. Kinship Relations as a Support System for Children

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pp. 157-182

We saw in Chapter 6 that households and their characteristics are significant determinants of the well-being of this population. In this chapter we are going to look more closely at the exact composition of those households by the circle of kin around individuals to see if we can isolate the importance of each kind of kinship relationship. ...

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8. Motives for Sharing Food and Other Prosocial Behavior

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pp. 183-210

In this chapter, we conclude our consideration of a life history analysis of the !Kung adaptation. In the preceding chapters, we depended upon data collected in 1967–1969 for other purposes to explore issues of the production and distribution of food resources. ...

References

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pp. 211-220

Index

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pp. 221-235

Production Notes

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pp. 249-249