Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. 2-11

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

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pp. xi-xiv

Inthe early 1970sIran across two or three item s indicating thatin 1917 an Alton Augustus Adam s becam e “the firstblack bandm aster in the United States N avy.” These item s surprised and puzzled m e,since it was well known thatbefore W orldW ar IIblacks couldserve inthe navy onlyas m ess attendantsand stew ards, ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

Thisprojectw ouldhave been im possiblewithoutthe generous assistance and expertsupportofanum ber ofindividualsand institutions.The partnership betw een Sam uel Floyd,founder of the Center for Black M usic Research (CBM R),and Alton Augustus Adam s,Jr.,a business leader in the Virgin Islands and son of the m em oirs’ author,established its foundation. ...

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introduction: the soul of alton adams

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pp. 1-18

Alton Augustus Adam s and W .E.B.DuBoism ade for arem arkablepairof friends.The first was anything but a revolutionary,while the other was labeled aradical.They were born twenty-one years and seventeen hundred m iles apart— one inaDanish colony inthe W estIndies,the other in M assachusetts. ...

the memoirs of alton augustus adams, sr., 1889–1987

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1. a historical memoir

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pp. 21-29

Ihave undertaken towritethishistoricalm em oiratthe insistence ofm any friends and relatives and because ofadeeply rooted sense ofresponsibilityto younger generations ofVirginIslanders seeking knowledge abouttheirpast and a m ore m eaningful understanding of their distinct cultural heritage. ...

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2. the st.thomas craftsmen of the nineteenth century

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pp. 30-46

The backbone ofthe St.Thom as com m unityinthe nineteenthcentury was the native artisan class.The rootsofthisclass extended back intothe days ofslavery.Chronicshortages ofwhitesettlers forced m any early plantation owners striving toattain the m axim um in self-sufficiency to assign a sm allnum ber ofbondsm en toskilled occupations. ...

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3. the value of education

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pp. 47-60

Like alm ostallofm y contem poraries,Ibegan schoolatthe age ofsix.M y siblings and Ifirstattended M rs.Vialet’s school.The Danes were strong believers in public education and were am ong the earliest Europeans to adoptfree com pulsory education in the eighteenth century. ...

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4. music in the virgin islands and the founding of the adams juvenile band (1910)

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pp. 61-85

In m y youth St.Thom as was alive with the sound ofm usic.N otonly was m usican integralpartofm y fam ilylife,butitperm eated the entire com m unity, constituting the core of our cultural life.O ur rich m usical heritage derives from m any sources.Contrary tothose who wouldtrace allour culturaltraditions back toAfrica, ...

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5. the united states navy band of the virgin islands (1917–1923)

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pp. 86-122

The wobblyeconom y ofthe VirginIslands tookasharp plunge in 1914with the adventofW orldW ar I.N orm alchannelsoftrade and com m erce were perm anently disrupted.People w ere thrown out of w ork,prices rose,and there were scarcities offoodstuffsand other essentials. ...

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6. the navy band’s 1924 united states tour

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pp. 123-140

The apogee ofthe navy band’ssuccess cam e in 1924withitscelebrated tour ofthe eastern United States.1 Through thistour the band and the Virgin Islands were brought to the attention of m illions of Am ericans w ho attended our concerts,heard us on the radio,or read aboutus in new spapers. ...

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7. the close of the naval years (1925–1931)

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pp. 141-174

The USS Kittery,w ithour returning bandsm en and luggage on deck,pulled alongside the navy yard dock on H asselIsland at8:00 P.M .Septem ber 13, 1924.O ur m en disem barked quicklyand were transferred toalaunch waiting to take them across the harbor to King’sW harf. ...

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8. the naval administration (1917–1931): an evaluation

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pp. 175-186

A work ofhistory isone thatseeks by m eans ofappraisal,assessm ent,characterization, or evaluation,to chronicle and interpret events,happenings, and,especially,the peopleoflong ago.The m ethod used for presentation therefore should necessarilybe rationaland scientific and notpolitical,ideological, sentim ental,or prejudicial. ...

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9. civilian government and politics (the 1930s)

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pp. 187-232

Our band arrived in Guantánam o,Cuba,the latter partofFebruary 1931, and inashorttim e the bandsm en were settled in barracks.The navalreservation ofwhich we were now partw as alarge one located on the southeast coast.A djustm enttoour new surroundings was difficult. ...

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10. the power of the press (the 1940s)

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pp. 233-262

Adam s’s newspaper proprietorship cam e to a sudden end with the bom bing ofPearlH arbor and hisrecalltoactive dutyfrom the N avalFleet Reserve.Sentback to Cuba,Adam s created whatappears tobe the navy’s firstdocum ented and officialracially integrated band by com bining eight ofhisform er band m em bers with an all-w hite unitalready ...

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11. tourism and the hotel association (the 1950s)

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pp. 263-286

The Virgin Islands’ tourist affluence is no overnight m iracle,no chance occurrence.A s far back as the m id-1890s,St.Thom as was already gearing itsdevelopm entand the attitudes ofitspeopleto accom m odatevisitors.I recallthatin m y youth,atthe W estIndiaCom pany landing dock, ...

Editorial Methods

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pp. 287-292

Editorial Notes

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pp. 293-334

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 335-340

Index

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pp. 341-368