Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. iii-v

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Tables and Graphs

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xi

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xxii

In a paper presented to the First Symposium of the South African Medical Research Council's Tuberculosis Research Institute, in August of 1985, Doctors P. B. Fourie, G. S. Townshend, and H. Kleeberg posed the following problem. Since the disease [TB] is totally curable and available control measures are ...

read more

Introduction: Industrialization and the Political Economy of Tuberculosis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-21

Tuberculosis was the number one cause of death in Europe and America from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century.1 Although the disease was by no means unknown before this time, its impact on human populations increased tremendously during the early years of the industrial revolution. The rise of industrial development and the ...

read more

1. Preindustrial South Africa: A Virgin Soil for Tuberculosis?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-32

Western-trained medical authorities who have studied the epidemiology of tuberculosis in South Africa have been nearly unanimous in asserting that the African populations of the region were, for all practical purposes, free from the disease prior to their contact with Europeans. Africans in effect represented, like island populations in the Pacific, a virgin ...

read more

2. Urban Growth, "Consumption," and the "Dressed Native," 1870–1914

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-66

Until the 1870s the South African economy was dominated by herding and agriculture. Its African population was primarily rural, living on farms and in kraals and small towns scattered over the African veld. Few Africans, other than those residing in royal homesteads, lived in large concentrated settlements and only a small number of European ...

read more

3. Black Mineworkers and the Production of Tuberculosis, 1870–1914

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-91

Although the major urban centers of South Africa provided important foci for the initial spread of tuberculosis in southern Africa, it was the mines in Kimberley and especially on the Rand that were the major producers of tuberculosis prior to World War I.1 The immense size of the mine labor force, over 200,000 on the Rand alone by 1910, together ...

read more

4. Migrant Labor and the Rural Expansion of Tuberculosis, 1870–1938

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 92-125

Just prior to World War I, a settled urban African population was beginning to emerge in the towns and cities of South Africa. Yet most Africans who lived and worked in urban centers were temporary sojourners, moving back and forth between the towns and the countryside. Within the gold-mining industry, where temporary employment for periods of six to ...

read more

5. Slumyards and the Rising Tide of Tuberculosis, 1914–1938

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-158

World War I marked the beginning of a period of rapid industrial growth in South Africa centered on the development of secondary industries and accompanied by a dramatic expansion of urban populations. These changes were paralleled by a steady rise in TB mortality. African TB mortality rates peaked during World War I and then, following a ...

read more

6. Labor Supplies and Tuberculosis on the Witwatersrand, 1913–1938

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-193

Although tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates rose steadily for blacks living within both the urban and rural areas of South Africa from World War I through the mid-1930s, they dropped dramatically within the country's gold-mining industry. TB rates on the Rand, in fact, mirrored the mortality rates of the major urban centers, excluding those of ...

read more

7. Segregation and Racial Susceptibility: The Ideological Foundation of Tuberculosis Control, 1913–1938

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 194-210

For medical officers working on the Rand and in other urban and industrial centers of South Africa, the struggle against TB in the 1920s and 1930s was an exercise in holding back the tide. TB control was based on a policy of exclusion rather than amelioration. Sanitary segregation, slum clearance, and medical screening were instruments for ...

read more

8. Industrial Expansion, Squatters, and the Second Tuberculosis Epidemic, 1938–1948

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-248

If efforts to control tuberculosis in South Africa during the 1920s and 1930s were an exercise in building social barriers against the rising tide of tubercular infection, the late 1930s and 1940s must be seen as a period in which these barriers were swept aside by a crashing new wave of disease. The tendency for urban authorities to deal with TB by ...

read more

9. Tuberculosis and Apartheid: The Great Disappearing Act, 1948–1980

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-298

The victory of the Nationalist party in 1948 brought to power a govern-ment whose political agenda was markedly different from that of itspredecessor. The Nationalists represented a constellation of interestgroups who were diametrically opposed to the pattern of social andeconomic development that had shaped South African society over the...

read more

Epilogue: The Present and Future of Tuberculosis in South Africa

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 299-319

A central argument of this study has been that TB control measures in South Africa from the beginning of this century up to the present time have involved the application of exclusionary policies designed to keep the disease out of the social and economic centers of white society. Despite shifts in medical ideas concerning the causes and prevention of ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 321-366

Select Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 367-377

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 379-389

Production Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 391-391