Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Theocritus’s Encomium of Ptolemy is not one of his best-known or most-admired poems, but these are exciting times for the study of Ptolemaic culture, and the need for a new study of this poem seemed, at least to me, self-evident. How far this book goes toward filling that need is a matter for others. ...

Conventions and Abbreviations

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pp. ix-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-72

Theocritus’s Idyll 17 (EP)1 celebrates Ptolemy II “Philadelphus,”2 who became co-regent of Egypt and the Ptolemaic empire with his father, Ptolemy I “Soter,” in 2853 and then assumed the throne in his own right on Soter’s death in 283/2; he died in 246, to be succeeded by his son Ptolemy III “Euergetes.” ...

Sigla

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pp. 73-74

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Encomium of Ptolemy Philadelphus

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pp. 75-92

From Zeus let us begin and, Muses, cease with Zeus, best of the immortal ones, whenever we raise our voices in song.1 But of men let Ptolemy be named in the first place, at the end, and in the middle, for he is the greatest of men. ...

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Commentary

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pp. 93-200

Already, then, as the proem establishes apparently discrete categories of being, vv. 7–8 test the boundary (as indeed does Ptolemy) between analogy and identity through a self-conscious acknowledgment that the language and mode of praise, the hymnos (cf. above, p. 8, 8n.), has been transferred from god to man. ...

References

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pp. 201-218

General Index

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pp. 219-222

Index of Greek Words

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pp. 223-224

Index Locorum

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pp. 225-226

Further Reading, Production Notes

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pp. 242-245