Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. iii-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-ix

I have benefited greatly from criticism of the ideas expressed in these pages. Invited lectures provided one venue for such criticism. In that connection I wish to thank the Kyoto American Studies Seminar, the Race, Gender, and Class Association, the Labor History Group at the University of Pittsburgh, the Thomas Merton Center, the Havens ...

ONE: STILL WHITE

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1. All about Eve, Critical White Studies, and Getting Over Whiteness

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pp. 3-26

The cover of a rhapsodic 1993 special issue of Time showed us “The New Face of America.” Within, the news magazine proclaimed the United States to be “the first universal nation,” one that supposedly was not “a military superpower but . . . a multicultural superpower.” Moving cheerfully between the domestic and the global, an article ...

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2. Smear Campaign: Giuliani, the Holy Virgin Mary, and the Critical Study of Whiteness

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pp. 27-43

The soundbite was consistent if odd. Every time I returned to the hotel between meetings in New York City in late September 1999, the radio news echoed Mayor Rudolph Giuliani’s charges: An artist had constructed a work by “throwing elephant dung at a picture of the Virgin Mary,” and now the Brooklyn Museum was about to display it, using ...

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3. White Looks and Limbaugh’s Laugh

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pp. 44-54

The chauvinism and churlishness with which I begin this otherwise modest and even-tempered essay both derive from my having grown up along that part of the Mississippi River that divides Missouri from Illinois. It is easy to be chauvinistic about that stretch of the river, the lone portion of the Mississippi to divide slavery from freedom. Along the ...

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4. White Workers, New Democrats, and Affirmative Action

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pp. 55-67

“Without a constitutionally structured programme of deep and extensive affirmative action,” African National Congress legal theorist Albie Sachs wrote in 1991, “a Bill of Rights in South Africa is meaningless.” Sachs added that affirmative action “is redistributory rather than conservative in character. . . . In the historical conditions of South Africa, ...

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5. “Hertz, Don’t It?” White “Colorblindness” and the Mark(et)ings of O. J. Simpson (with Leola Johnson)

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pp. 68-93

A quarter-century ago, O. J. Simpson told of his strategy for responding to racial taunts. It consisted of a sharp jab to the offender’s chest, accompanied by a literal punch line: “Hertz, don’t it?” The humor rested on the bitter contrast of Simpson’s tremendous success as an athlete who crossed over to become a beloved corporate icon, advertising ...

TWO: TOWARD NONWHITE HISTORIES

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6. Nonwhite Radicalism: Du Bois, John Brown, and Black Resistance

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pp. 97-102

Amid the empty rhetoric and commercialized hype over the millennium, we risked missing an anniversary of tremendous significance. The year 2000 marked the 200th anniversary of John Brown’s birth. In his magnificent 1909 biography of Brown, the great African American scholar and activist W. E. B. Du Bois perfectly set the grand and ...

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7. White Slavery, Abolition, and Coalition: Languages of Race, Class, and Gender

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pp. 103-120

The rich historical literature on slavery and the idea of free labor, and the fine body of work on the roots of women’s rights organizations and ideas in antislavery movements, fully establish the mid-nineteenth century United States as illustrating Orlando Patterson’s insight that Western ideas about freedom were “generated from the experience of ...

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8. The Pursuit of Whiteness: Property, Terror, and National Expansion, 1790–1860

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pp. 121-137

Paul Gilroy, holding acerbically forth in the collection Black British Cultural Studies, warns that attempts to write in an interdisciplinary way about identity “can send the aspirant practitioners of cultural studies scuttling back toward the quieter sanctuaries of their old disciplinary affiliations, where the problems and potential pleasures of thinking ...

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9. Inbetween Peoples: Race, Nationality, and the “New-Immigrant” Working Class

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pp. 138-168

In 1980 Joseph Loguidice, an elderly Italian American from Chicago, sat down to tell his life story to an interviewer. His first and most vivid childhood recollection was of a race riot that occurred on the city’s near north side. Wagons full of policemen with “peculiar hats” streamed into his neighborhood. But the “one thing that stood out in my mind,” ...

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10. Plotting against Eurocentrism: The 1929 Surrealist Map of the World

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pp. 169-176

Eurocentrism, the dictionaries tell us, came into usage as a critical termas recently as thirty years ago. However, the struggle against the fraud-ulence and terror that accompany and proceed from the habit of plac-ing the so-called white so-called West at the center of the world has afar longer and prouder history. Naming the enemy is all to the good, ...

THREE: THE PAST/PRESENCE OF NONWHITENESS

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11. What If Labor Were Not White and Male?

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pp. 179-202

Before becoming the greatest historian of race and class of his generation, Alexander Saxton was a young activist working in the railroad industry. In a lengthy article for the Daily Worker during World War II, he captured the complexity of racial discrimination among railway unions. The brotherhoods that organized railroad labor included ...

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12. Mumia Time or Sweeney Time?

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pp. 203-211

In February 1995, Bay Area Typographical Union Local 21, what labor historians are used to calling a conservative craft union, resolved to advocate full freedom for the African American journalist and political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal. Convicted in a speedy and irregular 1982 trial for the 1981 murder of a Philadelphia policeman, Abu-Jamal ...

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13. In Conclusion: Elvis, Wiggers, and Crossing Over to Nonwhiteness

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pp. 212-240

Director Aimee Sands’s forthcoming film attempts to bring the insights of the critical study of whiteness to a broad audience. Its title, Crossing Over, captures much, including the move from academic discourse to the popular and the possibility of breaching color lines. It conjures up the image of what Susan Gubar has studied as “racechange”—the ...

Notes

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pp. 241-311

Credits

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pp. 313-314

Index

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pp. 314-323

Production Notes

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pp. 324-324