Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Further Reading, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. ii-v

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: Juno Moneta

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pp. 1-6

William Blackstone insisted that property, and therefore market relations, are driven by desire. This eroticism should not surprise us. Etymology tells us that money is a woman. The word “money” derives from Juno Moneta. Juno, queen of heaven, was the Roman goddess of womanhood, the personification of the feminine. Her title, “Moneta,” means “she who ...

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1. Pandora’s Amphora: The Eroticism of Contract and Gift

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pp. 7-82

Almost three thousand years ago, Hesiod warned against gifts.2 In ancient times, the titan Forethought (Prometheus) taught mankind how to cheat the gods out of the profits of sacrifice.3 Later, when Zeus punished man by taking away fire,4 Forethought once again cheated the gods, by restoring fire to man. Zeus, seeking ...

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2. Orpheus’s Desire: The End of the Market

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pp. 83-148

Orpheus, the most creative of all living beings, sang so beautifully that he charmed wild beasts; trees and rocks moved on their own in order to follow him.2 He exceeded his mother, Calliope, the muse of music, as well as divine Apollo himself. Mortality was the source of Orpheus’s art: he sang in a vain attempt to fill the void left by the death of his beloved Eurydice. The gods, ...

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3. Narcissus’s Death: The Calabresi-Melamed Trichotomy

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pp. 149-204

Narcissus was the most beautiful of mortals and he knew it. Loved by both men and women, he was unable to return love.2 The seer Teresias predicted that Narcissus would live as long as he failed to recognize himself. Although Narcissus dismissed this as nonsense, it was destined to come to pass. The oread Echo was known for ...

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4. The Midas Touch: The Lethal Effect of Wealth Maximization

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pp. 205-275

Ovid told two myths about King Midas, which on first reading seem quite diverse.2 Lacanian psychoanalysis explains their hidden connection. The first is Midas Aureus—literally Golden Midas, but more commonly known as the Midas Touch. This tale is so familiar that it has led to a common English expression. As is so often the case, however, the cliché represses the ...

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5. The Eumenides’ Return: The Founding of Law Through the Repression of the Feminine

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pp. 276-312

The Eumenides,1 Aeschylus’s account of legal origins, reveals that postmodernism precedes, rather that succeeds, modernism. Relating the trial of Orestes for the murder of his mother Clytemnestra, The Eumenides illustrates the moment when law and civilization supplants chaos and barbarism—the moment when we become subjects by submitting ...

INDEX

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pp. 313-318

Production Notes

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pp. 319-319