Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

...San Diego, California, may strike the reader as a strange place to coimplete a book on the legendary Irish-American big-city political machines such as New York's Tammany Hall or the Daley organization in Chicago. Yet America's Finest City (as the local news commentators are so fond of saying) may not be so inappropriate a locale after all. Despite a reputation...

read more

1. The Irish and the Big-City Machines

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-24

...Irish-American machine politics from the mid-nineteenth century to the present in eight once heavily Irish cities: New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Jersey City, and Albany. Daniel Patrick Moynihan has observed that the Irish-American genius has been organizational rather than entrepreneurial...

read more

2. Building the Nineteenth-Century Machines, 1840–1896

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-66

...Between 1846 and 1855 1.4 million Irish famine immigrants came to the United States. Though nearly all were rural cotters and laborers, more than 90 percent of the migrants would settle in the cities. The immigrants were field laborers, not farmers, in a singlecrop economy. Only 6 percent of them would resettle...

read more

3. Guardians of Power: The Irish Versus the New Immigrants, 1896–1928

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-106

...The fragile penny-pinching Irish Democratic machines collapsed in the depression-ridden 18908. As the panic of 1893 lengthened into depression, voters blamed the Democrats. The Democracy controlled the presidency, many governorships of northern states, and most of the big-city machines. Democratic politicians did little to alleviate the suffering of the growing...

read more

4. The Crisis of the 1930s: The Depression, the New Deal, and Changing Machine Fortunes, 1928–1950

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-139

...The 192.05 represented the Irish machine's heyday. Freed from state interference, controlling a growing patronage supply, and temporarily shielded from electoral pressures from the new immigrants for a greater sharing of power and jobs, the Irish bosses could meet the demands of both party and ethnicity. Bread had replaced circuses in the machine's repertoire...

read more

5. The Last Hurrah? Machines in the Postwar Era, 1950–1985

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 140-190

...The Irish machines that marched out of the Great Depression and the New Deal were not the same ones that had marched in. Mighty Tammany was toppled, to be resurrected in weaker and temporary form after World War II. The Hague organization, the Tiger's Siamese twin across the Hudson, succumbed...

read more

6. Machine Building, Irish-American Style

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-236

...The once-mighty Irish big-city machines are nearly extinct. Tammany Hall, the Buckley organization in the Bay Area, Frank Hague's powerful Jersey City organization, the Steel City Lawrence organization—all are gone. Only Chicago and Albany remain as relics of the past. In all likelihood, though, these two vestiges will soon pass from the scene...

read more

7. Rainbow's End: Machines, Immigrants, and the Working Class

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 236-266

...The performance of the classic immigrant-based big-city machines has sparked a second controversy, which is concerned with the consequences of boss rule. During the machine's heyday, reformers had attacked the urban bosses for weakening democracy and promoting plutocracy. Traditional liberals such as James Bryce and M. Ostrogorski deplored the capture...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 267-304

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 305-332

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 333-345