Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. iii-iv

Contents

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pp. v-v

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Preface

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pp. vii-ix

I first became interested in Elmore Leonard because I like to read crime fiction and I’m originally from Detroit. It wasn’t until I was working as an En glish professor in Boston, married with family, that a friend told me to read Swag. From the first page, I regretted the delay. What hooked me almost instantly was Leonard’s sense of place. This was ...

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1. Being Cool: Learning Authenticity

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pp. 1-46

If you’ve heard the name Elmore Leonard, chances are you’ve also heard him described as “the Dickens of Detroit.” At one point in his career, this honorific appeared in the publicity pages of nearly every new paperback edition of an Elmore Leonard book and in the columns of nearly every fresh review. Anyone who’s read Leonard can see why, even in its original, diminished form—“A ...

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2. Being Other(s): “Making” Imaginary Friends

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pp. 47-91

The most prominent features of Leonard’s Westerns refl ect the patterns of relationship that shaped his childhood, adolescence, and young manhood. In summarizing that pro cess, we might begin with an imaginative and sociable boy, responsive to the nuances of the human voice and the vicarious thrill of adventure books, Western fi lms, and news accounts of legendary gangsters. This boy ...

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3. Plays Well with Others: Take Five

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pp. 92-134

The first de cade of Leonard’s career as a writer of crime fi ction was interrupted at several points by work that harkened back to his Western phase, such as Valdez Is Coming (1970), Forty Lashes Less One (1972), and Gunsights (1979), and by work on screenplays. The latter include some that sold—The Moonshine War (1970, based on the novel of 1969), Picket Line (1970), American Flag (1971), Joe ...

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4. Choruses: After 1980

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pp. 134-200

In jazz, a “chorus” is a single iteration of a basic song or tune, usually twelve to thirty- two measures long. A jazz performance can comprise dozens of choruses, starting with the first, or “head,” which is typically played as written, followed by successive improvisations on the head’s fundamental chord structure. The results can both surprise and delight, incorporating melodies that ...

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Conclusion: What Happens Next?

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pp. 201-206

Just after Bill Hill closes the deal in Touch that will make Juvenal a media star, Leonard off ers us a glimpse of the evangelical huckster’s thoughts, in free indi-rect discourse. Hill is glad to be back in the saddle and no longer selling motor homes, as he’s had to do ever since Uni- Faith folded: “Work work work. But damn he felt good. Bill Hill was promoting people again and not some dead-ass ...

Notes

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pp. 207-210

Works Cited

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pp. 211-216

Index

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pp. 217-225