Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-6

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Preface & Acknowledgements

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pp. vi-viii

Modern Subjects/Colonial Texts intervenes in a fiercely contested area of contemporary intellectual inquiry: fiction written under colonialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. From Edward Said's Orientalism (1978) onwards, much literary and cultural analysis has been applied to colonial discourse using the lens of postcolonial theory, ...

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Chapter 1. Theorizing Colonial Discipline in Malaya

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pp. 1-29

The house does not seem to be an English country house: the grounds are expansive, but a little too manicured: on Sundays they are filled with brides taking wedding photos, scattered like confetti on the grass. The walls have been recently painted a brilliant white, reflecting the light scattered back off the straits. ...

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Chapter 2. The Situation of Writing

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pp. 30-48

On 15 October 1929 the Straits Times of Singapore carried an article on Hugh Clifford's impending and unexpected departure from the colony, and his stepping down from the position of Governor of the Straits Settlements and Governor General of the Federated Malay States. ...

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Chapter 3. Trader, Dandy, Hero: Racial Masculinities

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pp. 49-68

In the preceding chapters, we have seen how gender, empire, and writing are linked in Clifford's work as technologies of control, the management of natural forces. We have also seen how, as a late-Victorian writer, Clifford expresses uneasiness regarding these forces which for earlier writers such as Kingsley and Carlye are benign. ...

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Chapter 4. Women's Place

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pp. 69-88

The preceding chapters have shown the persistent centrality of women to Clifford's technologies of governance. The shared secret of a woman's affection brings two men together in both "In the Heart of Kalamantan" and "Greater Love": deeds of empire are imagined as chivalric service performed for women. ...

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Chapter 5. Diseases, Pathologies, and Disciplining the Self

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pp. 89-113

"[I]n the colonial situation," writes Frantz Fanon, "going to see the doctor, the administrator, the constable or the mayor are identical moves."1 Fanon's vision of medicine as a central element of colonial governance, a fig-leaf of postrationalisation covering the brutal reality of colonial power, comes towards the climax of the anti-colonial struggle, ...

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Chapter 6. The Situation of Reading

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pp. 114-134

In 1905, at a club meeting in London, Clifford met a young doctor, a "fine-looking fellow"1 dedicated to the service of Empire. His name was W. Stewart, and he had been pondering, upon graduation, whether to join his father in a rural British practice or whether to venture further afield. ...

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Chapter 7. By Way of Conclusion

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pp. 135-138

The house is not, and never was, an English country house. From the busy street, coming out from the bustling, marble-clad air conditioning of shopping centres, you can sometimes catch a glimpse of it, up the road, past the waiting sentries, the curve in the drive, the lawns. A flagpole, and a flash of white stucco. ...

Notes

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pp. 139-170

Bibliography

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pp. 171-184

Index

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pp. 185-192