Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-3

Title Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 4-4

Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This book completes my trilogy examining the New West started in 2000 with The Cultures of the American West and continued with The Rhizomatic West in 2008. Although they work separately, in my mind they were always connected, if rhizomatically! In the years of writing this book, I have been lucky to work with many strong believers in research, ...

read more

Introduction: Big Hats, Horses, and Dust: The Visible and Invisible West

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-18

In 2003 stories started to appear about the destruction of “Laramie Street,” a Warner Brothers back lot used in the filming of many Hollywood Westerns since the 1930s. As one report put it, “It’s an old Southern California story: Tear down a piece of history, replace it with a slice of suburbia. ...

read more

1. Dead Westerns: The Posthumous and the Post-Western

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-55

For many critics the Western as a film genre is dead and buried, rather like Laramie Street, with which this book began. In 1996 Lee Clark Mitchell called the last chapter of his book Westerns “Last Rites,” arguing that at the genre’s birth in 1913 producer Thomas Ince told cowboy actor William S. Hart that Westerns “were on their way out.”1 ...

read more

2. Mourning in America: The Lusty Men (1952) and Bad Day at Black Rock (1954)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-96

In this chapter I examine how two early post-Westerns, The Lusty Men (1952) and Bad Day at Black Rock (1954), interrogate concerns over inheritance, the mythic past, and types of haunting in the creation of a different form of cinematic expression, a hybrid, dialogical version of the time-image and the movement-image. ...

read more

3. "You and Your God's Country”: The Misfits (1961)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-133

If The Lusty Men and Bad Day at Black Rock initiate post-Western cinema, then a film that both relates to and diverges from them in new and interesting ways is John Huston’s The Misfits (1961). Kouvaros quotes Siegfried Kracauer, as I did in chapter 2: “One waits, and one’s waiting is a hesitant openness, albeit of a sort that is difficult to explain.”1 ...

read more

4. "We Keep Heading West": Dennis Hopper and the Post-Western

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-163

In 1962 Dennis Hopper took a photograph on the set of The Sons of Katie Elder, where he was filming with director Henry Hathaway. The image is of Dean Martin and John Wayne on horseback framed behind a dominant tripod and camera that both unites and divides the two iconic actors. ...

read more

5. Exile and Dislocation in the Urban Post-Western : The Exiles (1961) and Fat City (1972)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 164-201

There is a problem of the urban in the West. Krista Comer describes this anomaly: “Countless Saturday afternoon matinees visualized for moviegoers a nineteenth-century frontier transportation system of train, horse, wagon; not the car or highway system moviegoers used to get themselves to the local theatre. ...

read more

6. Post-Western Genealogies: John Sayles’s Lone Star (1996) and Silver City (2004)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 202-239

As earlier chapters have demonstrated, post-Westerns have in common their collective interest in the mythic afterlife of the West and the various pulses it carries posthumously into the present. The consequences of inheritance and history are at the heart of John Sayles’s Lone Star (1996). ...

read more

7. "Opened from the Inside Out”: Wim Wenders’s Don’t Come Knocking (2005)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 240-271

Wim Wenders was born on August 14, 1945, in Dusseldorf, Germany; it was V-J Day, the day of the armistice of World War II. In 1943, at the U.S. Army’s Dugway Proving Ground in the Utah desert, where Wenders would later scout for film locations, Standard Oil had built “German Village,” a so-called doomtown, ...

read more

8. The Idioms of Living: Donna Deitch and Allison Anders

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 272-304

This chapter examines the work of two female directors whose films show the many different ways post-Westerns interfere with established genres to reappropriate and reinterpret them for new audiences. In the process, the political dimensions of these films, particularly around themes of gender, sexuality, and family, ...

read more

9. The Schizo-West: Down in the Valley (2005)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 305-327

Released the same year as Don’t Come Knocking and Brokeback Mountain, David Jacobson’s Down in the Valley is a much darker, more troubling film, which, despite its strong cast and contemporary resonance, has had almost no critical attention. However, its self-reflexiveness and contextual detail make it vital to this study of the post-Western. ...

read more

10. Spook Country: The Pensive West of No Country for Old Men (2007)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 328-350

Chapter 1 included a lengthy discussion of the Coen brothers’ The Big Lebowski precisely because it operates as a genre-stretching post-Western offering the possibility of traditional narrative convention while examining its clichés in a manner that exemplifies Deleuze’s call for a cinema capable of taking “a reflective or intellectual detour.” ...

read more

Conclusion: Is There a Politics of the Post-Western?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 351-358

In my meditations on the ending of No Country for Old Men and its “transformation of the sensory fabric of ‘being together’” I invoked the ideas of Jacques Rancière, who has figured throughout this book. He claims, “Politics and art, like forms of knowledge, construct ‘fictions,’ ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 359-406

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 407-415