Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword

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pp. vii-xiv

...It is clear, then, that the natural need to eat, to feed oneself, can become mimetically overloaded and transformed first into a desire, then into a passionate desire, either to deprive oneself of food or to gorge oneself. The idea that both anorexia and bulimia...

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Introduction: Anorexia and the Spirit of the Times

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pp. xv-xxxvi

...It was not always so. In 1911, French physician Francis Heckel wrote that his patients sometimes resisted losing weight, preferring to “stay obese for reasons of fashionable appearance.” The need to have an “impressive...

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Eating Disorders and Mimetic Desire

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pp. 1-44

...Among younger women, eating disorders are reaching epidemic proportions. Th e most widespread and spectacular at this moment is the most recently identified, the so-called bulimia nervosa, characterized by binge eating followed by “purging,” sometimes through laxatives or diuretics, more oft en through self-induced vomiting. Some researchers claim that in American colleges at least one ...

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A Conversation with René Girard,

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pp. 45-73

...My interest in the subject goes all the way back to my childhood. Th ere were cases of anorexia—not very severe but real enough—in my own family, in particular a young cousin whom I talk about in the text. Consequently, when I read Claude Vigée’s book....

Notes

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pp. 74-76