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Soundings in Kings
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summary
The reigning assumptions in 1970s and 1980s scholarship on 1 and 2 Kings, and indeed on all of the Deuteronomistic history, have come under serious question. How can differing views of that history be reconciled? What sources were available to the authors? Should we call them "authors"? How well do the Books of Kings fit into the larger history of which they are a part; just who composed that history, toward what end, and in what context? How do the assumptions of contemporary interpreters influence the answers we give to those questions? In Soundings in Kings, international scholars pursue these and related questions by examining 1 and 2 Kings as an independent work, identifying new methods and models for envisioning the social location of the authors (or redactors) of Kings, the nature of the intended audience or audiences, and the political and rhetorical implications of its construction. Soundings in Kings demonstrates the role of Kings as a cornerstone work within the Hebrew Bible, a crossroads between prophecy, poetry, wisdom, ancestral and national narrative, and ritual instruction.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-12
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  1. Part One: Sources and Transmission
  2. pp. 13-14
  1. 1. Text and Literary History: The Case of 1 Kings 19(MT and LXX)
  2. pp. 15-34
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  1. 2. Warfare and Treaty Formulas in the Background of Kings
  2. pp. 35-68
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  1. Part Two: Prophecy and Redaction
  2. pp. 69-70
  1. 3. Prophetess of Doom: Hermeneutical Reflectionson the Huldah Oracle (2 Kings 22)
  2. pp. 71-80
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  1. 4. Hezekiah, Manasseh, and Dynastic or Transgenerational Punishment
  2. pp. 81-106
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  1. Part Three: Authors and Audiences
  2. pp. 107-108
  1. 5. The Redaction of Kings and Priestly Authority in Jerusalem
  2. pp. 109-118
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  1. 6. The Sociolinguistic and Rhetorical Implications of the Source Citations in Kings
  2. pp. 119-134
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  1. Response: Kings Resisting Privilege
  2. pp. 135-142
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  1. Closing Remarks
  2. pp. 143-146
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. 147-150
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 151-206
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  1. Author Index
  2. pp. 207-210
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  1. Scripture Index
  2. pp. 211-223
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