In this Book

Baltimore '68
summary

In 1968, Baltimore was home to a variety of ethnic, religious, and racial communities that, like those in other American cities, were confronting a quickly declining industrial base. In April of that year, disturbances broke the urban landscape along lines of race and class.

This book offers chapters on events leading up to the turmoil, the riots, and the aftermath as well as four rigorously edited and annotated oral histories of members of the Baltimore community. The combination of new scholarship and first-person accounts provides a comprehensive case study of this period of civil unrest four decades later.

This engaging, broad-based public history lays bare the diverse experiences of 1968 and their effects, emphasizing the role of specific human actions. By reflecting on the stories and analysis presented in this anthology, readers may feel empowered to pursue informed, responsible civic action of their own.

Baltimore '68 is the book component of a larger public history project, "Baltimore '68 Riots: Riots and Rebirth." The project's companion website (http://archives.ubalt.edu/bsr/index.html ) offers many more oral histories plus photos, art, and links to archival sources. The book and the website together make up an invaluable teaching resource on cities, social unrest, and racial politics in the 1960s. The project was the corecipient of the 2009 Outstanding Public History Project Award from the National Council on Public History.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-xiv
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xv-xx
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xxi-xxii
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  1. Part I: April 1968
  2. p. 1
  1. 1. The Dream Deferred: The Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Holy Week Uprisings of 1968
  2. pp. 3-25
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  1. 2. Jewell Chambers: Oral History
  2. pp. 26-38
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  1. 3. Why Was There No Rioting in Cherry Hill?
  2. pp. 39-47
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  1. Part II: The Political, Religious, and Urban Planning Context
  2. p. 49
  1. 4. “White Man’s Lane”: Hollowing Out the Highway Ghetto in Baltimore
  2. pp. 51-69
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  1. 5. Spiro T. Agnew and the Burning of Baltimore
  2. pp. 71-85
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  1. 6. Thomas Carney: Oral History
  2. pp. 86-102
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  1. 7. “Church People Work on the Integration Problem”: The Brethren’s Interracial Work in Baltimore, 1949–1972
  2. pp. 103-121
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  1. 8. Convergences and Divergences: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements—Baltimore, 1968
  2. pp. 122-141
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  1. Part III: Consequences for Education, Business, and Community Organizing
  2. p. 143
  1. 9. The Pats Family: Oral History
  2. pp. 145-153
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  1. 10. How the 1968 Riots Stopped School Desegregation in Baltimore
  2. pp. 154-179
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  1. 11. Pivot in Perception: The Impact of the 1968 Riots on Three Baltimore Business Districts
  2. pp. 180-207
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  1. 12. “Where We Live”: Greater Homewood Community Corporation, 1967–1976
  2. pp. 208-225
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  1. 13. Planning for the People: The Early Years of Baltimore’s Neighborhood Design Center
  2. pp. 227-245
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  1. 14. Robert Birt: Oral History
  2. pp. 246-258
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  1. Epilogue: History and Memory: Why It Matters That We Remember
  2. pp. 259-264
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 265-268
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 269-272
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