Cover

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pp. 1-2

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 3-10

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

This little book’s path to the light of day began on the Advisory Council of the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies in Washington, D.C. I joined the council when I retired from the Foreign Service in 1998 for the Stanford history department, ...

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Introduction: Getting Beyond Eurasia’s DNA

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pp. 1-14

Russia’s 2008 presidential election was less suspenseful than ours. Months before the polls on March 2, it was clear that Dmitry Medvedev would succeed Vladimir Putin as president and that Putin would then take over as Medvedev’s prime minister. ...

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I. The Weakness of Civil Society

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pp. 15-37

Whether we realized it or not, many of us in the West grew up permeated with ideas that set “society” over against state power. They are centuries old. In America, our founders looked to the English philosopher John Locke’s defense of the Glorious Revolution of 1688 for legitimation of their resistance to arbitrary royal rule here. ...

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II. Politics as Elite Infighting

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pp. 38-62

Deprived of the unifying ideology of Communism, they no longer fight to end the exploitation of man by man, nor to consolidate and improve “really existing socialism.” They are not (or not yet) driven by nationalism based on ethnocultural identities. So the natural answer would be that post-Soviet elites fight about economics. ...

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III. The Politics of Economics and Sovereignty

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pp. 63-90

Deprived of the unifying ideology of Communism, they no longer fight to end the exploitation of man by man, nor to consolidate and improve “really existing socialism.” They are not (or not yet) driven by nationalism based on ethnocultural identities. So the natural answer would be that post-Soviet elites fight about economics. ...

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IV. States, Nations, and Nationalisms in Eurasia

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pp. 91-119

If the end of 2005 opened a new era of Russian outward pressure and stiffening resistance from Russia’s neighbors, is twenty-first-century Eurasia likely to face rolling turbulence reminiscent of twentieth-century Europe? Part of the answer will depend on whether state-building and state-consolidation in Eurasia will be underpinned ...

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V. Today’s Eurasia and the United States

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pp. 120-144

As a global power the U.S. will always be interested in Eurasia and engaged with its peoples and nations. Eurasia is too large and important a part of the world to be ignored. It casts a shadow of the old Soviet threat forward in time, and its axis—the Russian Federation—is nuclear armed. So are its neighbors: ...

Notes

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pp. 145-166

Suggestions for Further Reading

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pp. 167-170

Index

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pp. 171-178

Envoi

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pp. 179-180