Cover

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pp. 1-2

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 3-8

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Prologue: Reading Appalachia

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pp. 1-18

With two rivers, the Elk and the Kanawha, merging in the middle of it, Kanawha County was probably always a place of meeting and exchange. Before the Civil War, a significant salt industry thrived on the riverbanks. After the Civil War, coal became a prominent industry, followed by chemical refineries. ...

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Introduction: Soul on Appalachian Ice

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pp. 19-28

“This is not a minister’s battle,” Donald Dobbs insisted, speaking into a microphone. Five members of the Kanawha County Board of Education and a crowd of fellow West Virginians listened on a rainy June evening in 1974. ...

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1. A Modern American Conflict

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pp. 29-56

Who is this Kanawha County protester whose image was widely distributed (see figure 5)? Staring down the camera with a look of defiance, she fit the bill of a news media that, by 1974, was accustomed to serving images of Appalachia not as information but as entertainment and affectation. ...

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2. True Sons of Appalachia

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pp. 57-90

The Kanawha County textbook controversy, like other curriculum disputes that preceded and followed it, was an opportunity for people to articulate their individual and collective position in relation to national identity. As education historians Jonathan Zimmerman and Joseph Moreau have shown in their histories of U.S. curriculum disputes, ...

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3. Sweet Alice and Secular Humanism

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pp. 91-132

Unlike George Dietz, Ed Miller, and William Pierce, Alice Moore was universally portrayed as a central figure if not the sole instigator of the textbook controversy. Representations of her were as diametrically opposed as media takes on the conflict as a whole: she was either reviled or revered. ...

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4. Reproducing the Souls of White Folk

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pp. 133-166

The previous chapter discussed how Connie Marshner’s Blackboard Tyranny aimed to inspire mothers to assume the prescribed role of defender against secular humanism—in effect, to see themselves as Sweet Alices, feminine conservative Christian activists. ...

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5. The Right Soul

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pp. 167-182

In 1979 Bill Best, a professor at Berea College in Kentucky, published a controversial essay in Mountain Review titled “Stripping Appalachian Soul.” It was a psychological diagnosis of the trend of volunteerism that swept through the mountain South in the 1960s. ...

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Epilogue: Writing Appalachia

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pp. 183-188

In the last few weeks of 1974, every kid in Kanawha County, including me, came home from school with a permission slip, which, if signed, allowed access to the new language arts curriculum. Researching and writing this book was a challenge for many reasons, but mostly it was a sweet deal to go back to 1974, ...

Appendix: Keywords

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pp. 189-196

Notes

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pp. 197-222

Sources and Selected Bibliography

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pp. 223-234

Index

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pp. 235-242