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Handheld XRF for Art and Archaeology
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summary
Over the last decade the technique of X-ray fluorescence has evolved, from dependence on laboratory-based standalone units to field use of portable and lightweight handheld devices. These portable instruments have given researchers in art conservation and archaeology the opportunity to study a broad range of materials with greater accessibility and flexibility than ever before. In addition, the low relative cost of handheld XRF has led many museums, academic institutions, and cultural centres to invest in the devices for routine materials analysis purposes. Although these instruments often greatly simplify data collection, proper selection of analysis conditions and interpretation of the data still require an understanding of the principles of x-ray spectroscopy. These instruments are often marketed and used as ‘point and shoot' solutions; however, their inexpert use can easily generate deceptive or erroneous results. This volume focuses specifically on the applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology. The papers deal with experimental methodologies, protocols, and possibilities of handheld XRF analysis in dealing with the complexity of materials encountered in this research.

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 1-4
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  1. Acknowledgements
  2. pp. 5-6
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  1. Table of Contents
  2. pp. 7-8
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. 9-14
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  1. List of Tables
  2. pp. 15-16
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  1. 1. Introduction
  2. pp. 17-36
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  1. 2. Handheld X-ray fluorescence analysis of Renaissance bronzes: Practical approaches to quantification and acquisition
  2. pp. 37-74
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  1. 3. Application of a handheld XRF spectrometer in research and identification of photographs
  2. pp. 75-130
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  1. 4. Handheld XRF for the examination of paintings: proper use and limitations
  2. pp. 131-158
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  1. 5. XRF analysis of manuscript illuminations
  2. pp. 159-190
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  1. 6. XRF analysis of historical paper in open books
  2. pp. 191-214
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  1. 7. Quantitative non-destructive analysis of historic silver alloys: X-ray fluorescence approaches and challenges
  2. pp. 215-248
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  1. 8. The analysis of porcelain using handheld and portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometers
  2. pp. 249-312
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  1. 9. Handheld XRF use in the identification of heavy metal pesticides in ethnographic collections
  2. pp. 313-348
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  1. 10. Using handheld XRF to aid in phasing, locus comparisons, and material homogeneity assessment at an archaeological excavation
  2. pp. 349-378
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  1. 11. Handheld XRF elemental analysis of archaeological sediments: some examples from Mesoamerica
  2. pp. 379-400
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  1. 12. X-Ray fluorescence of obsidian: approaches to calibration and the analysis of small samples
  2. pp. 401-422
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  1. 13. Handheld XRF analysis of Maya ceramics: a pilot study presenting issues related to quantification and calibration
  2. pp. 423-448
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  1. 14. Glass analysis utilizing handheld X-ray fluorescence
  2. pp. 449-470
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 471-472
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  1. The Editors
  2. pp. 473-474
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