In this Book

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-xiv
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  1. Translator’s Note
  2. pp. xxi-xxv
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  1. Key Terms
  2. pp. xxvi-xxvii
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. xxviii-xliii
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  1. Editor’s Introduction
  2. pp. xlvii-cxlix
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  1. Foreword to This Edition
  2. pp. cli-clix
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  1. Volume 1
  2. pp. 1-2
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  1. Part I
  2. pp. 3-32
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  1. Chapter 1. Exterior Configuration of North America
  2. pp. 33-44
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  1. Chapter 2. Of the Point of Departure and Its Importance for the Future of the Anglo-Americansa
  2. pp. 45-73
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  1. Chapter 3. Social State of the Anglo-Americans
  2. pp. 74-90
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  1. Chapter 4. Of the Principle of the Sovereignty of the People in America
  2. pp. 91-97
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  1. Chapter 5. Necessity of Studying What Happens in the Individual States before Speaking about the Government of the Union
  2. pp. 98-166
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  1. Chapter 6.a Of the Judicial Power in the United States and Its Action on Political Societyb
  2. pp. 167-178
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  1. Chapter 7. Of Political Jurisdiction in the United StatesTN4
  2. pp. 179-185
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  1. Chapter 8. Of the Federal Constitution
  2. pp. 186-267
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  1. Part II
  2. pp. 277-277
  1. Chapter 1. How It Can Be Strictly Said That in the United States It Is the People Who Govern
  2. pp. 278-278
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  1. Chapter 2. Of Parties in the United States
  2. pp. 279-288
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  1. Chapter 3. Of Freedom of the Press in the United States
  2. pp. 289-301
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  1. Chapter 4. Of Political Association in the United States
  2. pp. 302-312
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  1. Chapter 5. Of the Government of Democracy in America
  2. pp. 313-374
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  1. Chapter 6a. What Are the Real Advantages That American Society Gains from the Government of Democracy?
  2. pp. 375-401
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  1. Chapter 7. Of the Omnipotence of the Majority in the United States and Its Effectsa
  2. pp. 402-426
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  1. Chapter 8. Of What Tempers Tyranny of the Majority in the United States
  2. pp. 427-450
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  1. Chapter 9. Of the Principal Causes That Tend to Maintain the Democratic Republic in the United Statesa
  2. pp. 451-514
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  1. Chapter 10. Some Considerations on the Present State and Probable Future of the Three Races That Inhabit the Territory of the United States
  2. pp. 515-648
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 649-657
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 658-687
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Volume II
  2. pp. i-i
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-xx
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  1. Volume 2
  2. pp. xxi-689
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. 690-695
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  1. First Part
  2. pp. 696-696
  1. Chapter 1a
  2. pp. 697-710
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  1. Chapter 2a. Of the Principal Source of Beliefs among Democratic Peoplesb
  2. pp. 711-725
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  1. Chapter 3.a Why the Americans Show More Aptitude and Taste for General Ideas Than Their Fathers the English
  2. pp. 726-736
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  1. Chapter 4.aWhy the Americans Have Never Been as Passionate as the French about General Ideas in Political Matters
  2. pp. 737-741
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  1. Chapter 5.a How, in the United States, Religion Knows How to Make Use of Democratic Instincts
  2. pp. 742-753
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  1. Chapter 6a Of the Progress of Catholicism in the United States
  2. pp. 754-756
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  1. Chapter 7. What Makes the Minds of Democratic Peoples Incline toward Pantheism
  2. pp. 757-758
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  1. Chapter 8.a How Equality Suggests to the Americans the Idea of the Indefinite Perfectibility of Man
  2. pp. 759-762
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  1. Chapter 10.a Why the Americans Are More Attached to the Application of the Sciences Than to the Theoryb
  2. pp. 775-787
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  1. Chapter 11.a In What Spirit the Americans Cultivate the Artsb
  2. pp. 788-795
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  1. Chapter 12a Why the Americans Erect Such Small and Such Large Monuments at the Same Time
  2. pp. 796-799
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  1. Chapter 13.a Literary Physiognomy of Democratic Centuries
  2. pp. 800-812
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  1. Chapter 14a Of the Literary Industry
  2. pp. 813-814
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  1. Chapter 15a Why the Study of Greek and Latin Literature Is Particularly Useful in Democratic Societies
  2. pp. 815-817
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  1. Chapter 16.a How American Democracy Has Modified the English Languageb
  2. pp. 818-829
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  1. Chapter 17.
  2. pp. 830-842
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  1. Chapter 18.a Why American Writers and Orators Are Often Bombasticb
  2. pp. 843-844
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  1. Chapter 19.a Some Observations on the Theater of Democratic Peoplesb
  2. pp. 845-852
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  1. Chapter 20.a Of Some Tendencies Particular to Historians in Democratic Centuriesb
  2. pp. 853-860
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  1. Chapter 21.a Of Parliamentary Eloquence in the United Statesb
  2. pp. 861-870
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  1. Second Part: Influence of Democracy on the Sentiments of the Americansa
  2. pp. 871-871
  1. Chapter 1.a Why Democratic Peoples Show a More Ardent and More Enduring Love for Equality Than for Libertyb
  2. pp. 872-880
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  1. Chapter 2.a Of Individualism in Democratic Countries
  2. pp. 881-884
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  1. Chapter 3. How Individualism Is Greater at the End of a Democratic Revolution than at Another Timea
  2. pp. 885-886
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  1. Chapter 4.a How the Americans Combat Individualism with Free Institutionsb
  2. pp. 887-894
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  1. Chapter 5.a Of the Use That Americans Make of Association in Civil Lifeb
  2. pp. 895-904
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  1. Chapter 6.a Of the Relation between Associations and Newspapersb
  2. pp. 905-910
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  1. Chapter 7.a Relations between Civil Associations and Political Associationsb
  2. pp. 911-917
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  1. Chapter 8.a How the Americans Combat Individualism by the Doctrine of Interest Well Understood
  2. pp. 918-925
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  1. Chapter 9.a How the Americans Apply the Doctrine of Interest Well Understood in the Matter of Religion
  2. pp. 926-929
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  1. Chapter 10.aOf the Taste for Material Well-Being in America
  2. pp. 930-934
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  1. Chapter 11.a Of the Particular Effects Produced by the Love of Material Enjoyments in Democratic Centuriesb
  2. pp. 935-938
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  1. Chapter 12.a Why Certain Americans Exhibit So Excited a Spiritualismb
  2. pp. 939-941
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  1. Chapter 13.aWhy the Americans Appear So Restless Amid Their Well-Being
  2. pp. 942-947
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  1. Chapter 14.a How the Taste for Material Enjoyments Is United, among the Americans, with the Love of Liberty and Concern for Public Affairs
  2. pp. 948-953
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  1. Chapter 15.a How from Time to Time Religious Beliefs Divert the Soul of the Americans toward Non-Material Enjoymentsb
  2. pp. 954-962
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  1. Chapter 16.a How the Excessive Love of Well-Being Can Harm Well-Beingb
  2. pp. 963-964
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  1. Chapter 17.a How, in Times of Equality and Doubt,It Is Important to Push Back the Goal of Human Actionsb
  2. pp. 965-968
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  1. Chapter 18a Why, among the Americans, All Honest Professions Are Considered Honorable
  2. pp. 969-971
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  1. Chapter 19.a What Makes Nearly All Americans Tend toward Industrial Professions
  2. pp. 972-979
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  1. Chapter 20.aHow Aristocracy Could Emerge from Industry
  2. pp. 980-985
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  1. Third Parta Influence of Democracy on Mores Properly So Called
  2. pp. 986-986
  1. Chapter 1.a How Mores Become Milder as Conditions Become Equal
  2. pp. 987-994
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  1. Chapter 2.a How Democracy Makes the Habitual Relations of the Americans Simpler and Easierb
  2. pp. 995-999
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  1. Chapter 3.a Why the Americans Have So Little Susceptibility in Their Country and Show Such Susceptibility in Oursb
  2. pp. 1000-1004
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  1. Chapter 4.a Consequences of the Three Preceding Chapters
  2. pp. 1005-1006
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  1. Chapter 5.a How Democracy Modifies the Relationships of Servant and Master
  2. pp. 1007-1019
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  1. Chapter 6.a How Democratic Institutions and Mores Tend to Raise the Cost and Shorten the Length of Leases
  2. pp. 1020-1024
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  1. Chapter 7.a Influence of Democracy on Salaries
  2. pp. 1025-1030
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  1. Chapter 8.a Influence of Democracy on the Familyb
  2. pp. 1031-1040
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  1. Chapter 9.a Education of Young Girls in the United States9
  2. pp. 1041-1047
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  1. Chapter 10.a How the Young Girl Is Found Again in the Features of the Wife
  2. pp. 1048-1051
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  1. Chapter 11.a How Equality of Conditions Contributes to Maintaining Good Morals in America
  2. pp. 1052-1061
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  1. Chapter 12.a How the Americans Understand the Equality of Man and of Woman
  2. pp. 1062-1067
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  1. Chapter 13.a How Equality Divides the Americans Naturally into a Multitude of Small Particular Societiesb
  2. pp. 1068-1070
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  1. Chapter 14.a Some Reflections on American Manners
  2. pp. 1071-1079
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  1. Chapter 15.a Of the Gravity of Americans and Why It Does Not Prevent Them from Often Doing Thoughtless Thingsa
  2. pp. 1080-1084
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  1. Chapter 16.a Why the National Vanity of the Americans Is More Anxious and More Quarrelsome Than That of the Englishb
  2. pp. 1085-1088
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  1. Chapter 17.a How the Appearance of Society in the United States Is at the Very Same Time Agitated and Monotonous
  2. pp. 1089-1092
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  1. Chapter 18.a Of Honor in the United States and in Democratic Societies
  2. pp. 1093-1115
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  1. chapter 19.a Why in the United States You Find So Many Ambitious Men and So Few Great Ambitionsb
  2. pp. 1116-1128
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  1. Chapter 20.a Of Positions Becoming an Industry among Certain Democratic Nations
  2. pp. 1129-1132
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  1. Chapter 21.a Why Great Revolutions Will Become Rarea
  2. pp. 1133-1152
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  1. Chapter 22.a Why Democratic Peoples Naturally Desire Peace and Democratic Armies Naturally Desire War
  2. pp. 1153-1164
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  1. Chapter 23.a Which Class, in Democratic Armies,Is the Most Warlike and the Most Revolutionary
  2. pp. 1165-1169
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  1. Chapter 24.a What Makes Democratic Armies Weaker Than Other Armies While Beginning a Military Campaign and More Formidable When the War Is Prolongedb
  2. pp. 1170-1175
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  1. Chapter 25.a Of Discipline in Democratic Armies
  2. pp. 1176-1177
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  1. Chapter 26.a Some Considerations on War in Democratic Societies
  2. pp. 1178-1186
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  1. Fourth Part
  2. pp. 1187-1190
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  1. Chapter 1. Equality Naturally Gives Men the Taste for Free Institutions
  2. pp. 1191-1193
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  1. Chapter 2.a That the Ideas of Democratic Peoples in Matters of Government Naturally Favor the Concentration of Powersb
  2. pp. 1194-1199
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  1. Chapter 3. That the Sentiments of Democratic Peoples Are in Agreement with Their Ideas for Bringing Them to Concentrate Powera
  2. pp. 1200-1205
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  1. Chapter 4
  2. pp. 1206-1220
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  1. Chapter 5. That among the European Nations of Today the Sovereign Power Increases Although Sovereigns Are Less Stablea
  2. pp. 1221-1244
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  1. Chapter 6. What Type of Despotism Democratic Nations Have to Feara
  2. pp. 1245-1261
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  1. Chapter 7.a Continuation of the Preceding Chapters
  2. pp. 1262-1277
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  1. Chapter 8.a General View of the Subject
  2. pp. 1278-1285
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 1286-1294
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  1. Appendix 1
  2. pp. 1295-1302
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  1. Appendix 2
  2. pp. 1303-1359
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  1. Appendix 3
  2. pp. 1360-1364
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  1. Appendix 4
  2. pp. 1365-1367
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  1. Appendix 5
  2. pp. 1368-1372
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  1. Appendix 6
  2. pp. 1373-1376
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  1. Works Used by Tocqueville
  2. pp. 1377-1395
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 1396-1430
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 1431-1502
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  1. Acknowledgments, Production Notes
  2. pp. 1505-1506
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781614878834
Print ISBN
9780865978409
MARC Record
OCLC
851154594
Pages
1688
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
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