Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: Gendered Geographies and Narrative Markings

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pp. 1-40

This project would begin before I was even cognizant of the power of place and its relationship to colonialism, race, and gender. Yet, even as young children, many of us learn the constraints and limitations of the socially constructed spaces we find ourselves in. ...

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Chapter 1: “Remember What You Are”: Gendering Citizenship, the Indian Act, and (Re)mapping the Settler Nation-State

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pp. 41-86

Early debates around the statutes of the Canadian Confederation’s Indian Act coincide with the height of Mohawk writer E. Pauline Johnson’s (1861–1913) literary career. Johnson was born into an intricate matrix of emerging borders. ...

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Chapter 2: (Re)routing Native Mobility, Uprooting Settler Spaces in the Poetry of Esther Belin

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pp. 87-118

The politics of place for Native peoples is very tricky both socially and politically. While conceptions of Native identity are legislated differently depending on governing nation-states, tribal government systems, histories, and cultural differences, they share in common spatialized tendencies; ...

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Chapter 3: From the Stomp Grounds on Up: Indigenous Movement and the Politics of Globalization

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pp. 119-156

What happens when the poet takes over the cartographer’s tools? More interestingly, what happens when the poet is from a group of people who were categorized, colonized, and subjugated in the wake of the colonial moment and implementation of modern conceptions of space? ...

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Chapter 4: “Someday a Story Will Come”: Rememorative Futures

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pp. 157-202

Excerpts from historic almanacs, diaries, travel journals, and other writings by explorers and men of the frontier are examples of the written colonial world that was and still is instrumental in mapping the often-violent fantasies of American masculinities, frontiers, and borders. ...

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Conclusion: “She Can Map Herself Like a Country She Discovers”

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pp. 203-208

In writing about Occupy Wall Street movement, Joanne Barker recalls the particular history of Wall Street and its relationship to claiming Lenape land through enforcing settler forms of spatial constructions. She reminds us that the street itself was named after the physical wall built by the Dutch to claim the land base of Mana hata ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 209-212

These pages are perhaps the easiest and simultaneously the most difficult to write. I have been very fortunate in my life to have the support of friends, family, and colleagues who have helped me through the years and across the myriad geographies I have traveled. ...

Notes

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pp. 213-234

Index

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pp. 235-246

About the Author

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pp. 256-257