Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, About the Series, Copyright

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pp. ii-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Translator's Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Gratian's Treatise on Laws incorporates passages from authors of different periods with widely different Latin styles. While we have attempted to produce a smooth, readily intelligible English version that avoids Latinisms, we have also tried to stay close to the forms and structure of the original language. One reason is fidelity to the nature of legal material. Although many passages were from sermons, letters, and theological treatises, ...

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xxvii

The text presented in English in this volume is the introductory section of a textbook on Church law from the Middle Ages. In the hundreds of years since it first came into circulation in the middle of the twelfth century, this textbook, formally entitled the Harmony of Discordant Canons, has helped to shape the thinking of lawyers and legal scholars, clergy including popes from Alexander III to John Paul II, and, however indirectly, lay ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxviii-xxviii

In the preparation of this translation we have received advice and suggestions from many friends and scholars. We would like to express special thanks to Prof. Kenneth Pen nington, the editor of this series, and to Fr. Michael Carragher, a.p., who tested drafts of the translation with his students at the Universita Pontificia S. Tommaso in Rome. We would also like to thank Prof. Robert Figuera, and Professors Charles and Anne Duggan, ...

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The Treatise of Laws

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pp. 1-86

SINCE, when new cases arise, new remedies should be sought, I, Bartholomaeus Brixiensis, trusting in the bounty of the Creator, have improved as necessary the apparatus of the Decretum, not by removing anything, nor by attributing to myself any glosses I did not write, but simply by remedying any defect where correction seemed necessary, either because decretals had been omitted or shortened, or because new ...

Notes to the Decretum

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pp. 87-112

Notes to the Gloss

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pp. 113-116

Glossary

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pp. 117-121

Jurists in the Gloss

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pp. 122-123

Bibliography

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pp. 124-131

Back Cover

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pp. 161-161