Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: Inhuman Citizenship

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pp. 1-27

Why is the alien villain Ming the Merciless so captivating and arousing to the speaker in Jessica Hagedorn’s 1981 poem? Why do we love to hate, and hate to love, such grotesque and outlaw figures? I begin Inhuman Citizenship with this poem because it so provocatively evokes the three major themes of this study: ...

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1. Melancholic Citizenship: The Living Dead and Fae Myenne Ng’s Bone

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pp. 28-61

“What makes their ugliness so alive, so thick and impossible to let go of?” (35). Leila, the narrator of Fae Myenne Ng’s novel Bone, describes the marital strife of her mother and stepfather as a live, unseemly profusion to which both parties are painfully attached. ...

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2. Shameful Citizenship: Animal Jouissance and Brian Ascalon Roley’s American Son

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pp. 62-106

A sudden and disturbing flash of heat spreading through one’s body; a racing pulse; the urgent need to avert one’s eyes. These and other involuntary, physical manifestations of shame occur with such conspicuous frequency in Brian Ascalon Roley’s novel American Son that they categorically demand our readerly attention, ...

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3. Romantic Citizenship: Immigrant-Nation Romance, the Antifetish, and Chang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker

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pp. 107-145

The opening of Chang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker immediately introduces us to a domestic rupture: the Korean American narrator, Henry Park, tells us about the day that his wife left him. For Lelia, who is white, marriage to Henry had become unbearably alienating. ...

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4. Perverse Citizenship: The Death Drive and Suki Kim’s The Interpreter

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pp. 146-179

Throughout Inhuman Citizenship, I have discussed Asian American narratives of family and home, inquiring into what they reveal about the psychic lives of gendered racial citizenship and the U.S. nation-state. While these texts do not strictly conform to conventions of the “domestic novel” as a literary genre, ...

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Coda

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pp. 180-184

Each chapter of Inhuman Citizenship ends with an allusion to a heart or a secret kernel. In chapter 1, I call for an embedding of Ona’s heart in our own, so that we may participate in Bone’s project of animating what is other wise left behind. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 185-188

I have always enjoyed the acknowledgments section of books, which takes us behind the scenes and reveals how the apparent solitude of writing is actually part of a network of circulating ideas and affect. It gives me the greatest pleasure here to convey my appreciation to those who have imprinted the shaping and reshaping of this book. ...

Notes

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pp. 189-204

Bibliography

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pp. 205-216

Index

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pp. 217-242

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About the Author

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pp. 252-252

Juliana Chang is associate professor of English at Santa Clara University. She is the editor of Quiet Fire: A Historical Anthology of Asian American Poetry, 1892–1970.