Cover

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pp. 1-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

As a child growing up in Utah I attended church with my family every Sunday. Our Sunday school lessons were filled with stories of the prophet Joseph Smith Jr. whose faith and dedication established the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...

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Introduction: Negotiating Faithfulness

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pp. 1-30

Hawaiianness and Mormonism came to be fused through a religious invention initiated by the Mormon missionary George Q. Cannon who had a vision in 1851 that traced Polynesian lineage to The Book of Mormon and to Israel. This articulation expanded the racial and religious boundaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ...

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1. Mormonism, Race, and Lineage: The Making of a Chosen People

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pp. 31-54

In the 1850s the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, drawing upon dominant notions of race and worthiness, began to redraw the boundaries between those souls who they deemed chosen and those who were not. At that time the church reasoned that the social meanings of black skin marked sin and unworthiness. ...

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2. Lā'ie, a Promised Land, and Pu‘uhonua: Spatial Struggles for Land and Identity

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pp. 55-90

In 1865 the Mormon church purchased six thousand acres of the Lā‘ie ahupua‘a (a subsection of an island district that stretches pieshaped from the mountain to the sea) to provide Hawaiian Latter-day Saints with a gathering place in Hawai‘i where they could live among coreligionists. ...

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3. Called to Serve: Labor Missionary Work and Modernity

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pp. 91-122

As I described in the previous chapter, the process of transforming Lā‘ie into a modern town was not without conflict and contradiction. The diminishing significance of the gathering principle corresponded to political and economic shifts taking place in the Mormon church as a whole. ...

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4. In the Service of the Lord: Religion, Race, and the Polynesian Cultural Center

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pp. 123-156

On May 7, 1964, Emosi Damuni followed his cousin Isireli Racule across the Pacific from Fiji to the Polynesian Cultural Center in Lā‘ie, Hawai‘i. Damuni and his wife Sereima resigned from their jobs—his as a teacher at the local school and hers as a nurse—and immigrated with their family. ...

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5. Voyages of Faith: Contemporary Kanaka Maoli Struggles for Sustainable Self-Determination

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pp. 157-184

In the previous chapter I documented the tensions that arose between members of the Polynesian Cultural Center management who approached culture as a material object for tourism and the Polynesian student workers who got more out of their jobs than just a paycheck. ...

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Conclusion: Holomua, Moving Forward

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pp. 185-188

When I set off on the huaka‘i that became this book I wanted to make sense of how Polynesian members of the Mormon church negotiate what appeared to me to be an irreconcilable tension between a (politicized) ethnic identity and a Christian-American-Mormon affiliation. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 189-192

Iwas not a solitary traveler on this journey but was aided in my pursuits by colleagues, friends, and family. I thank Russell C. Taylor at the L. Tom Perry Special Collections Library at Brigham Young University–Provo for his help in accessing missionary records and oral histories and Kris Nelson at the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies ...

Notes

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pp. 193-210

Glossary

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pp. 211-214

Bibliography

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pp. 215-222

Index

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pp. 223-232