Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-4

Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Introduction: The Movement and the City of Brotherly Love

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-17

In the early 1960s a new generation's voice would emerge across the nation, responding to the kinds of themes highlighted in Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) Port Huron Statement of 1962: the threat of nuclear confrontation, the contradictions between American affluence and minority and Third World poverty, ...

read more

1. The Old Left and the 1960s

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-33

The watershed moment in the origins of the new Left in America was the virtual collapse of the Communist Party in the United States following the Twentieth Party Congress in Moscow and the subsequent Soviet invasion of Hungary in 1956. Within several years Party membership and associated networks precipitously declined ...

read more

2. The Quaker Schools

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-72

The campuses of Swarthmore, Haverford, and Bryn Mawr Colleges are about as far away from the gritty neighborhoods of Philadelphia as one can possibly get. Two of these liberal arts colleges—Haverford and Bryn Mawr—tended to coordinate their student activism; ...

read more

3. The Catholic Schools

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 73-87

Virtually none of the literature addressing student opposition to the Vietnam War or, more broadly, the emergence of the New Left movement, considers the experience of Roman Catholic colleges and universities. There is a marginalized literature addressing Catholic movements for social justice and peace, ...

read more

4. From Subway School to Ivy League

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 88-131

Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia's dominant Center City campuses, illustrate an important juxtaposition of New Left experience. Temple, though considered by many the Philadelphia equivalent of the City University of New York, only stumbled into 1960s New Left activism, ...

read more

5. The Beloved Community Goes to War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-166

In the early 1960s, prior to the Americanization of the Vietnam War, the peace movement in Philadelphia focused attention on the struggle to eliminate or at least reduce nuclear testing. The participants in this effort were mostly a hardy band of pacifists, Old Leftists, and liberals. ...

read more

6. The Politics of White Antiracism: People for Human Rights

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-192

Although the Philadelphia Resistance concentrated most of its attention on the war in Indochina, it also worked with other activist groups who were focusing on domestic social issues. Of these groups, People for Human Rights (PHR) emerged as the most vocal. ...

read more

7. The Rise and Fall of the New Left

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-232

To examine the history of the New Left movements on college campuses in the late 1960s and early 1970s is to enter a minefield of interpretative brawls and extraordinarily contradictory developments. First of all, there is the ideological battlefield on which conservatives and some liberals see utopian dreams descending into a nihilistic nightmare, ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-268

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 269-276

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 277-279

I have been most fortunate in having so many people to thank for offering me advice, guidance, and criticism over the seven years during which this book was written. Let me start with my students at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, those studying social welfare policy, U.S. history since 1920, ...