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Learning to Emulate the Wise
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Learning to Emulate the Wise is the first book of a three-volume series that constructs a historically informed, multidisciplinary framework to examine how traditional Chinese knowledge systems and grammars of knowledge construction interacted with Western paradigms in the formation and development of modern academic disciplines in China. Within this volume, John Makeham and several other noted sinologists and philosophers explore how the field of "Chinese philosophy" (Zhongguo Zhexue) was born and developed in the early decades of the twentieth century, examining its growth and relationship with European, American, and Japanese scholarship and philosophy. The work discusses an array of representative institutions and individuals, including FengYoulan, Fu Sinian, Hu Shi, Jin Yuelin, Liang Shuming, Nishi Amane, Tang Yongtong, Xiong Shili, Zhang Taiyan, and a range of Marxist philosophers. The epilogue discusses the intellectual-historical significance of these figures and throws into relief how Zhongguozhexue is understood today.

Table of Contents

  1. Half Title Page
  2. pp. 1-2
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  1. Title Page
  2. pp. 3-3
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  1. Copyright
  2. pp. 4-4
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  1. Frontispece
  2. pp. 5-6
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. About the Series
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. xiii-xvi
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-36
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  1. Part I. From Philosophy to Zhexue
  2. pp. 37-38
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  1. 1. Nishi Amane and the Birth of “Philosophy” and “Chinese Philosophy” in Early Meiji Japan
  2. pp. 39-72
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  1. 2. The Role of Masters Studies in the Early Formation of Chinese Philosophy as an Academic Discipline
  2. pp. 73-102
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  1. 3. Zhang Taiyan, Yogācāra Buddhism, and Chinese Philosophy
  2. pp. 103-128
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  1. Part II. The Beida and Tsinghua Schools of Philosophy
  2. pp. 129-130
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  1. 4. Developing the Academic Discipline of Chinese Philosophy: The Departments of Philosophy at Peking, Tsinghua, and Yenching Universities (1910s–1930s)
  2. pp. 131-162
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  1. 5. Hu Shi and the Search for System
  2. pp. 163-186
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  1. 6. Introducing Buddhism as Philosophy: The Cases of Liang Shuming, Xiong Shili, and Tang Yongtong
  2. pp. 187-216
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  1. 7. Daoism as Academic Philosophy: Feng Youlan’s New Metaphysics (Xin lixue)
  2. pp. 217-236
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  1. 8. Jin Yuelin’s Ambivalent Status as a “Chinese Philosopher”
  2. pp. 237-272
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  1. Part III. The Critics’ Voices
  2. pp. 273-274
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  1. 9. Fu Sinian’s Views on Philosophy, Ancient Chinese Masters, and Chinese Philosophy
  2. pp. 275-310
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  1. 10. Marxist Views on Traditional Chinese Philosophy Pre-1949
  2. pp. 311-346
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  1. Epilogue: Inner Logic, Indigenous Grammars and the Identity of Zhongguo zhexue
  2. pp. 347-372
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 373-398
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