Title Page, Copyright

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pp. iii-iv

Contents

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pp. v-v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

I am very glad for the chance to express my gratitude to the many people who helped me in this work, without whom its completion would have remained an insurmountable problem (to use Maurice Blanchot’s apt phrase). First and foremost, I would like to thank Ian Balfour, Howard Adelman, and Stephen Levine for their unwavering ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-7

In the preface to the second edition of the Science of Logic, Hegel refers to “the peculiar restlessness and distraction of our modern consciousness.”1 Although the tone of this statement makes it sound like something to be avoided or at any rate minimized, a moment’s reflection tells us that for Hegel, it is one of modernity’s irreducible and ...

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Chapter One. Narrative Life Span, in the Wake

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pp. 8-40

Jacques Derrida’s lecture “Mnemosyne,” written shortly after the death of Paul de Man and devoted both to his work and to the friendship they shared, opens with a statement that is as complex as it is succinct. Its tone is sorrowful, compounding the loss to which it testifies by indicating from the outset what the lecture will lack: “I,” he ...

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Chapter Two. Memory in Theory

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pp. 41-73

As we saw in Chapter 1, one of the achievements of Arendt’s and Benjamin’s critiques of history is to have drawn attention to the ways in which modern history effectively eliminates the dimension of human experience from its discursive structure. The question remains, though, as to how to situate the concept of experience with respect to ...

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Chapter Three. Mourning Memory

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pp. 74-131

Despite the more complicated reading of Locke’s Essay that I hope to have generated in Chapter 2—especially in terms of the kinds of temporality that are generated when memory is understood to be mediated in and through language—it nonetheless remains the case that a more conventional understanding of Locke’s Essay prevails in discussions ...

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Chapter Four. Speculating on the Past,the Impact of the Present

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pp. 132-171

To argue for a rigorous reading of the “end” of historical time in Hegel is, in some sense, the condition for thinking the experience of narrative time in a mode other than that of the simple linearity of continuous progression. In Chapter 3, we demonstrated how Hegel’s complex mode of narrating the pastness of “art in its highest determination” ...

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Chapter Five. In Lieu of a Last Word

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pp. 172-200

To end with a discussion of the work of Maurice Blanchot is rife with difficulties, two of which I will mention by way of beginning. The first involves the sheer difficulty of reading his work. While to be sure, this seems to be something of a “side issue,” it is one with important consequences: An encounter with Blanchot’s texts—whether those of ...

Notes

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pp. 201-236

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Bibliography

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pp. 237-246

Aarsleff, Hans. From Locke to Saussure: Essays on the Study of Language and Intellectual History. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, Agacinski, Sylviane. Time Passing: Modernity and Nostalgia. Trans. Jody Agamben, Giorgio. Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life. Trans. Daniel Heller-Roazen. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1998....

Index

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pp. 247-255