In this Book

Aristotle and Black Drama
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
Civil disobedience has a tattered history in the American story. Described by Martin Luther King Jr. as both moral reflection and political act, the performance of civil disobedience in the face of unjust laws is also, Patrice Rankine argues, a deeply artistic practice. Modern parallels to King’s civil disobedience can be found in black theater, where the black body challenges the normative assumptions of classical texts and modes of creation. This is a theater of civil disobedience.

Utilizing Aristotle’s Poetics, Rankine ably invokes the six aspects of Aristotelian drama—character, story, thought, spectacle, song, and diction. He demonstrates the re-appropriation and rejection of these themes by black playwrights August Wilson, Adrienne Kennedy, and Eugene O’Neill. Aristotle and Black Drama frames the theater of civil disobedience to challenge the hostility that still exists between theater and black identity.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. ii-vi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Prologue
  2. pp. xi-xvi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-24
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Classical Origins of Character and Adrienne Kennedy’s Funnyhouse of a Negro, Electra, and Orestes
  2. pp. 25-60
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. The Oedipus Story and the Perfect Play, or the Gospel According to Rita Dove
  2. pp. 61-98
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Racial Intent and Dramatic Form
  2. pp. 99-142
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Aristotle’s “Spectacle” and August Wilson’s “Spectacle Character”
  2. pp. 143-174
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Freedom Songs and Metaphors of Healing
  2. pp. 175-204
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Civil Disobedience, Truth and Reconciliation and the Cosmopolitan Citizen
  2. pp. 205-224
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Epilogue
  2. pp. 225-228
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. References
  2. pp. 229-244
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 245-254
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.